revocable

adjective
rev·​o·​ca·​ble | \ ˈre-və-kə-bəl How to pronounce revocable (audio) also ri-ˈvō- How to pronounce revocable (audio) \
variants: or less commonly revokable \ ri-​ˈvō-​kə-​bəl How to pronounce revocable (audio) \

Definition of revocable

: capable of being revoked a revocable privilege

Examples of revocable in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Someone recommended using a revocable trust for them. Gary Singer, Sun Sentinel, 16 June 2022 Whatever the case, there are two types of trust funds: irrevocable and revocable (or living). Q.ai - Make Genius Money Moves, Forbes, 27 Oct. 2021 Living trusts are considered revocable when they are created, meaning the creators can make changes during their lifetimes. Liz Weston, oregonlive, 26 Feb. 2022 However, attorney Simasko thinks a revocable trust is the best option to bequeath property. Tanisha A. Sykes, USA TODAY, 3 Dec. 2021 The criminal charges relate to four victims, plus a revocable trust created by one of the victims, who later died. Kristina Davis, San Diego Union-Tribune, 8 Oct. 2021 The law goes even further regarding for revocable trust. Dallas News, 22 Aug. 2021 That immigration reform would give them lasting legal status, rather than the temporary – and revocable – relief from deportation offered by DACA. Kevin Johnson, The Conversation, 22 July 2021 Those payments were made by checks from Donald Trump's account signed by Trump himself, and later from the Donald J. Trump revocable trust, the indictment said. Erica Orden, CNN, 1 July 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'revocable.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of revocable

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for revocable

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin revocabilis, from revocare

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Time Traveler for revocable

Time Traveler

The first known use of revocable was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near revocable

revocability

revocable

revocation

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Statistics for revocable

Last Updated

22 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Revocable.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/revocable. Accessed 3 Jul. 2022.

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More Definitions for revocable

revocable

adjective
rev·​o·​ca·​ble | \ ˈre-və-kə-bəl, ri-ˈvō- How to pronounce revocable (audio) \

Legal Definition of revocable

: capable of being revoked

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