reverse psychology

noun

: a method of getting someone to do what one wants by pretending not to want it or by pretending to want something else

Examples of reverse psychology in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Ensure your headlines are varied, incorporating elements such as numbers for specificity, humor to engage, surprising statements to captivate, and negative framing to address potential concerns or reverse psychology tactics. Jodie Cook, Forbes, 13 Feb. 2024 If the goal of Biden’s cynical agitation was to use elementary reverse psychology to guide Republicans into endorsing views that are anathema to most American voters, mission accomplished. Noah Rothman, National Review, 3 Jan. 2024 But a bit of reverse psychology from Phoebe sees Monica accepting the challenge of outdoing herself compared to last year’s meal. Jackie Strause, The Hollywood Reporter, 23 Nov. 2023 The risky reverse psychology actually worked, and Jase Wirey was later voted out in what is still considered an iconic move in the game’s history. Sharon Tharp, Peoplemag, 27 July 2023 There’s probably some reverse psychology at play here: by owning its shortcomings, Patagonia boosts its reputation and becomes a brand people want to support. Jamie Ducharme, Time, 12 June 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'reverse psychology.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Dictionary Entries Near reverse psychology

Cite this Entry

“Reverse psychology.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reverse%20psychology. Accessed 20 Jul. 2024.

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