reserve clause

noun

Definition of reserve clause

: a clause formerly placed in a professional athlete's contract that reserved for the club the exclusive right automatically to renew the contract and that bound the athlete to the club until retirement or until the athlete was traded or released

Examples of reserve clause in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web But Flood, in a challenge to baseball's reserve clause, refused to report to the Phillies, and the Cardinals sent Browning and Willie Montanez to Philadelphia in his place while Flood filed a lawsuit against Commissioner of Baseball Bowie Kuhn. Mark Inabinett | Minabinett@al.com, al, "Casey Mize headlines Alabama’s first-round history in MLB Draft," 9 June 2020 That was when Curt Flood challenged MLB’s reserve clause – a rich man’s version of leg irons and cotton fields – and won. Paul Daugherty, Cincinnati.com, "Doc's Morning Line: Sports is a breather and a vacation. We need a vacation right now.," 3 June 2020 The National League adopted a reserve clause binding a player to his team in December 1879. Ronald Blum, The Denver Post, "Curt Flood set off the baseball free-agent revolution 50 years ago," 24 Dec. 2019 But each court decision chipped away at the reserve clause baseball’s owners were clinging to. BostonGlobe.com, "The brief, one-page letter from outfielder Curt Flood to baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn dated Dec. 24, 1969 informed Kuhn that Flood refused his trade from the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies that offseason and wished to be recognized as a free agent.," 24 Dec. 2019 Curt Flood was a pioneer in the process, refusing to play for the Phillies after being traded by the Cardinals in 1969 and challenging the reserve clause in 1970. Paul Sullivan, chicagotribune.com, "Column: Today’s baseball players live the good life, thanks in large part to someone they may not have heard of — Marvin Miller," 9 Dec. 2019 Flood will refuse to report to the Phillies and will take baseball to court over the reserve clause that binds a player perpetually to one team. Paul Montella, San Diego Union-Tribune, "This Date in Baseball," 6 Oct. 2019 At the time, the reserve clause, a part of every contract that bound players nearly irrevocably to their teams, was still in effect; free agency, which multiplied the earning power of players by many orders of magnitude, was still in the future. Bruce Weber, New York Times, "Jim Bouton, Author of Tell-All Baseball Memoir ‘Ball Four,’ Dies at 80," 10 July 2019 His antitrust lawsuit, Robertson v. NBA, destroyed the reserve clause that tied a player to an NBA team in perpetuity. Dave Clark, Cincinnati.com, "Ex-Bearcat/Royal Robertson No. 7 among ESPN's most influential in NBA," 2 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reserve clause.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reserve clause

1890, in the meaning defined above

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The first known use of reserve clause was in 1890

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Cite this Entry

“Reserve clause.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reserve%20clause. Accessed 21 Sep. 2020.

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