rescript

play
noun re·script \ˈrē-ˌskript\

Definition of rescript

  1. 1 :  a written answer of a Roman emperor or of a pope to a legal inquiry or petition

  2. 2 :  an official or authoritative order, decree, edict, or announcement

  3. 3 :  an act or instance of rewriting

Examples of rescript in a sentence

  1. <even though there was never an official rescript ordering mass genocide, that was indeed the intent and effect of the government's policy>

Did You Know?

Rescript was first used in the 15th century for the written reply of a sovereign or pope to a question about some matter of law or state, and then for any type of authoritative declaration. Since the 19th century, however, it has also seen use as a synonym of rewrite. Charlotte Brontë, for one, used the word this way in her novel Villette. "I wrote [the letter] three times ... subduing the phrases at every rescript," her narrator confesses.

Origin and Etymology of rescript

Middle English rescripte, from Latin rescriptum, from neuter of rescriptus, past participle of rescribere to write in reply, from re- + scribere to write — more at scribe


First Known Use: 15th century



Seen and Heard

What made you want to look up rescript? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

living or existing naturally in a region

Get Word of the Day daily email!

WORD GAMES

Take a 3-minute break and test your skills!

  • snowflake-closeup
  • Which is a synonym of imprecate?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ