reconsider

verb
re·con·sid·er | \ˌrē-kən-ˈsi-dər \
reconsidered; reconsidering; reconsiders

Definition of reconsider 

transitive verb

: to consider again especially with a view to changing or reversing

intransitive verb

: to consider something again

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Other Words from reconsider

reconsideration \ˌrē-kən-ˌsi-də-ˈrā-shən \ noun

Examples of reconsider in a Sentence

She refused to reconsider her decision not to loan us the money. Local opposition has forced the company to reconsider building a new warehouse here. We hope you will reconsider.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Meanwhile, a handful of House and Senate members called on Mr. Trump to cancel the Putin summit, or at least reconsider it. CBS News, "Russia dismisses indictment as attempt to "spoil" Trump-Putin meeting," 13 July 2018 But the labor movement must now reconsider the economics and politics of how unions conduct their business in light of a hostile Supreme Court majority and hostile elected governments in Washington and many states. Ed Kilgore, Daily Intelligencer, "Supreme Court Topples Precedent to Hobble Public Unions," 27 June 2018 However, his excellent performances with the national team in the World Cup has forced West Ham to seriously reconsider 'Chicharito's stay at the club, according to a former West Ham player. José Luis Sanchez Pando, chicagotribune.com, "'El Tri' players increase their value in Russia," 27 June 2018 Another motion made Tuesday, as to whether the full board should reconsider the actions of the executive board, already went through. Sarah Smith, star-telegram, "From start to end, how one seminary's scandal shaped the Southern Baptist's agenda," 13 June 2018 Companies reconsidered their choices because of public outcry, official investigations, and practical changes in technology. Adi Robertson, The Verge, "Here’s how companies have flouted net neutrality before and what made them stop," 11 June 2018 However, by the end of the day, Robert Kennedy had reconsidered and gone even further, calling a judge to win King’s release. Alice George, Smithsonian, "On the Eve of his Death, Robert Kennedy Was a Whirlwind of Empathy and Internal Strife," 7 June 2018 At the same time, our realist commitments should be reconsidered. Philip Ball, WIRED, "Questioning Truth, Reality, and the Role of Scientific Progress," 2 June 2018 That episode teases at what the show could be were its focus reconsidered: The normally shallower, sillier segments covering clothing and home décor reveal themselves as part of the language of living an out gay life. Richard Lawson, HWD, "Why L.G.B.T.-Centered TV Is Stuck in the Past," 30 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reconsider.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reconsider

1571, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

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Last Updated

27 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for reconsider

The first known use of reconsider was in 1571

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More Definitions for reconsider

reconsider

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reconsider

: to think carefully about (someone or something) again especially in order to change a choice or decision you have already made

reconsider

verb
re·con·sid·er | \ˌrē-kən-ˈsi-dər \
reconsidered; reconsidering

Kids Definition of reconsider

: to think carefully about again especially with the possibility of change or reversal

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Comments on reconsider

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