recalcitrance

noun

re·​cal·​ci·​trance ri-ˈkal-sə-trən(t)s How to pronounce recalcitrance (audio)
: the state of being recalcitrant

Examples of recalcitrance in a Sentence

punished her recalcitrance by taking away her driving privileges
Recent Examples on the Web Largely owing to Hungarian recalcitrance, the European Union took months to agree on a large aid package to Ukraine; more worrisome still, a group of Republicans has been able to stall a similarly large aid package in the U.S. Congress. Keith Gessen, The New Yorker, 15 Feb. 2024 And what are the costs associated with recalcitrance? Noah Rothman, National Review, 18 Jan. 2024 Meanwhile, Republicans make a similar argument about state Senate Democrats’ recalcitrance, albeit from a different perspective. Grace Segers, The New Republic, 25 Aug. 2023 Such recalcitrance — or intellectual rigor — aside, Brown makes a fit and fascinating subject. Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times, 15 Sep. 2023 But the recalcitrance has been particularly extreme in New Mexico. Rob Kuznia, CNN, 10 July 2023 Or does the entrenched recalcitrance of democracies—their resistance to being commanded—pose even greater dangers to them? Hal Brands, Foreign Affairs, 19 Oct. 2021 In the face of such recalcitrance, the Swiss station, which falls under the umbrella of public broadcaster Radio Television Switzerland, notes the concerns about AI — and embraces and seeks to de-mystify it. Jamey Keaten, Fortune, 28 Apr. 2023 Netanyahu’s recalcitrance stems in part from the fact that Russia, as a partner with Iran in supporting Syrian dictator Bashar Assad, has a military presence in Syria that could impede Israeli efforts to strike Iranian targets near the Syrian-Israeli border. Joel Gehrke, Washington Examiner, 30 Jan. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'recalcitrance.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1856, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of recalcitrance was in 1856

Dictionary Entries Near recalcitrance

Cite this Entry

“Recalcitrance.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recalcitrance. Accessed 19 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

recalcitrance

noun
re·​cal·​ci·​trance ri-ˈkal-sə-trən(t)s How to pronounce recalcitrance (audio)
: the state of being recalcitrant

More from Merriam-Webster on recalcitrance

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