quasi

adjective
qua·​si | \ ˈkwā-ˌzī How to pronounce quasi (audio) , -ˌsī; ˈkwä-zē How to pronounce quasi (audio) , -sē \

Definition of quasi

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : having some resemblance usually by possession of certain attributes a quasi corporation
2 : having a legal status only by operation or construction of law and without reference to intent a quasi contract

Definition of quasi- (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : in some sense or degree quasiperiodic quasi-judicial
2 : resembling in some degree quasiparticle

Examples of quasi in a Sentence

Adjective And as more people adopt these teachings as quasi religions, some adherents say their belief systems are no less valid than those based on that older collection of maxims, the Ten Commandments. — Daniel McGinn, Newsweek, 10 Jan. 2000 But also, bachelors, more than married people, blended the two spheres by making their public, non-familial peer group and other associations into quasi families and by carrying on their personal affairs in mostly public or semipublic places such as boardinghouses, saloons, the streets, clubhouses, and the like. — Howard P. Chudacoff, The Age of the Bachelor, 1999
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The quasi-messianic notion that Trump fights for us all, and asks for nothing in return also helped the rally speakers articulate the crowd’s end of the bargain: Now the loving great leader needs us to fight for him. Chris Lehmann, The New Republic, "Feeling Trump’s Pain," 11 Jan. 2021 Olive is a quasi-fictional character residing in a rural Mine town. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, "The Fast Forward 2020 Winter Bookies reading list," 4 Jan. 2021 Over the last 80 years, the legislature has time and again shifted authority to the executive branch, so much so that the president can often wield quasi-legislative power. Jay Cost, Washington Examiner, "Biden's Kitchen Cabinet," 31 Dec. 2020 The transfers are sometimes organized by regional chambers of commerce, which operate as quasi-governmental agencies, and labor recruitment companies that act as intermediaries and arrange for workers to be sent to specific factories. Washington Post, "Apple’s longtime supplier accused of using forced labor in China," 29 Dec. 2020 In China, history long occupied a quasi-religious status. Barbara Demick, The Atlantic, "Uncovering the Cultural Revolution’s Awful Truths," 18 Dec. 2020 The money would provide a new lifeline for the research programs overseen by a quasi-government agency created by voters in 2004, which has spent almost all of its initial state bond funding. John Myers, Los Angeles Times, "California voters embrace special rules for app-based drivers, reject rent control plan," 4 Nov. 2020 Fudge faced some criticism as the quasi-political boss of Cuyahoga County for a lack of turnout, though even in a perfect turnout scenario in Cuyahoga County, Trump would’ve won the state easily. cleveland, "The top newsmakers in Ohio politics for 2020: Analysis," 27 Dec. 2020 The result has been nothing short of the total transformation of what was once a quasi-public service into a profit-hungry industry. Natalie Shure, The New Republic, "Congress Doesn’t Care About Your Surprise Ambulance Bill," 22 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'quasi.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of quasi

Adjective

1632, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for quasi

Adjective

quasi-

Combining form

Latin quasi as if, as it were, approximately, from quam as + si if — more at quantity, so

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Time Traveler for quasi

Time Traveler

The first known use of quasi was in 1632

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Statistics for quasi

Last Updated

17 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Quasi.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/quasi. Accessed 24 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for quasi

English Language Learners Definition of quasi-

: in some way or sense but not in a true, direct, or complete way

quasi

adjective
qua·​si | \ ˈkwā-ˌzī, -ˌsī; ˈkwä-zē, -sē How to pronounce quasi (audio) \

Legal Definition of quasi

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: having such a resemblance to another thing as to fall within its general category a quasi corporation

quasi

adverb

Legal Definition of quasi (Entry 2 of 2)

: in some significant sense or degree often used in combination quasi-fiscal — see also quasi-judicial, quasi-legislative

History and Etymology for quasi

Adjective

Latin, as if, as it were, from quam as + si if

More from Merriam-Webster on quasi

Nglish: Translation of quasi for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of quasi for Arabic Speakers

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