pseudoscience

noun
pseu·do·sci·ence | \ˌsü-dō-ˈsī-ən(t)s \

Definition of pseudoscience 

: a system of theories, assumptions, and methods erroneously regarded as scientific

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from pseudoscience

pseudoscientific \ˌsü-dō-ˌsī-ən-ˈti-fik \ adjective
pseudoscientist \ˌsü-dō-ˈsī-ən-tist \ noun

Examples of pseudoscience in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Ultimately, pseudoscience was used to justify the torture and murder of millions. Erin Blakemore, Washington Post, "Holocaust Museum shows how Nazi theories affected 12 survivors," 1 July 2018 Even a convincing pseudoscience parody would have its cover blown coming from an official McGill account. Brian Barrett, WIRED, "A ‘Cancer Cure’ Video Skewered Bad Science—and Went Viral Itself," 10 July 2018 Unlike many of the industry’s other plainspoken deflaters of hype and pseudoscience, Suennen is generally careful not to publicly call out specific companies or entrepreneurs. Rebecca Robbins, STAT, "The gatekeeper: If you want to make it big in health care, it’ll help to get past Lisa Suennen first," 6 June 2018 Luckily, acclaimed science writer Carl Zimmer is here to unravel the tangled history of the science and pseudoscience surrounding heredity, in all its many forms. Megan Molteni, WIRED, "Maybe DNA Can’t Answer All Our Questions About Heredity," 28 May 2018 These claims are rough approximations of the golden ratio at best and pseudoscience at worst. Jay Bennett, Popular Mechanics, "The Mysteries of the Golden Ratio Explained by Math and Sunflowers," 11 May 2018 The marchers’ key demands remain the same as in 2017: raising the government’s allocation for science from 0.85% of the gross domestic product (GDP) to at least 3%, and stemming the tide of unscientific views and pseudoscience. Giorgia Guglielmi, Scientific American, "The March for Science is Back—Here’s What to Expect," 13 Apr. 2018 In the rough-and-ready labyrinths of social media, too, users clothed in anonymity have been reviving racist pseudoscience and conspiracy theories, without the fear of public censure or social ostracization. Sara Miller Llana, The Christian Science Monitor, "An old beast re-awoken, anti-Semitism stalks Europe, US once more," 11 Apr. 2018 In her view, snark or cheeky videos are not the problem: If people are really committed to a piece of pseudoscience, a video from someone like Mr. Zozaya will not convince them otherwise, no matter how respectful. Adrianne Jeffries, New York Times, "At 12, He Had a Viral Science Video. At 14, He Fears He Was Too Rude.," 2 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pseudoscience.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of pseudoscience

1796, in the meaning defined above

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about pseudoscience

Share pseudoscience

Statistics for pseudoscience

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for pseudoscience

The first known use of pseudoscience was in 1796

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for pseudoscience

pseudoscience

noun
pseu·do·sci·ence | \ˌsüd-ō-ˈsī-ən(t)s \

Medical Definition of pseudoscience 

: a system of theories, assumptions, and methods erroneously regarded as scientific

Other Words from pseudoscience

pseudoscientific \-ˌsī-ən-ˈtif-ik \ adjective

Comments on pseudoscience

What made you want to look up pseudoscience? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

to reject or criticize sharply

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Words from Greek and Roman Mythology Quiz

  • the-triumph-of-venus-by-alessandro-magnasco
  • Boreal comes from the name of the ancient Greek god of which wind?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!