prophecy

noun
proph·​e·​cy | \ ˈprä-fə-sē How to pronounce prophecy (audio) \
variants: or less commonly prophesy
plural prophecies also prophesies

Definition of prophecy

1 : an inspired utterance of a prophet
2 : the function or vocation of a prophet specifically : the inspired declaration of divine will and purpose
3 : a prediction of something to come

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Examples of prophecy in a Sentence

The prophecies of the author have all come true. She has the gift of prophecy.

Recent Examples on the Web

All that is left is to reunite the cast of Community for a big screen version and the prophecy will finally be complete. Sydney Bucksbaum, EW.com, "Alison Brie still has hope for a Community movie — but only if it's on Netflix," 22 June 2019 Visit the site of the Delphic Oracle who, according to legend, spoke for the God Apollo and told many of the prophecies that shaped the Hellenic Period. National Geographic, "Italy & Greece Middle School Expedition," 12 June 2019 Yet this should not obscure the quiet prophecy in Runciman’s own account. Adam Tooze, The New York Review of Books, "Democracy and Its Discontents," 6 June 2019 The prophecy may also refer to Littlefinger (a.k.a. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Who Has Green Eyes on Game of Thrones?," 29 Apr. 2019 And The Crimes of Grindelwald implies strongly that Credence may also be the subject of a previously unknown-to-us set of prophecies that involves brothers fighting one another and impacting the fate of the wizarding world. Aja Romano, Vox, "Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald’s bonkers plot twist, explained," 17 Nov. 2018 But both emphasize miracles, prophecy and other gifts of the Spirit. Vanessa Rancano, The Mercury News, "How Redding became an unlikely epicenter of modern Christian culture," 19 June 2019 Now his friends say that prophecy appears to have been true. Frank Bajak, The Seattle Times, "Ace Swedish coder held by Ecuador was defender of Assange," 14 Apr. 2019 The recent market turbulence could make investor skittishness a self-fulfilling prophecy. Nick Timiraos, WSJ, "Investors Are Betting That the Fed Hits Pause on Rate Hikes," 2 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'prophecy.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of prophecy

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for prophecy

Middle English prophecie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin prophetia, from Greek prophēteia, from prophētēs prophet

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Learn More about prophecy

Dictionary Entries near prophecy

prophage

prophane

prophase

prophecy

prophesize

prophesy

prophet

Statistics for prophecy

Last Updated

13 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for prophecy

The first known use of prophecy was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for prophecy

prophecy

noun

English Language Learners Definition of prophecy

: a statement that something will happen in the future
: the power or ability to know what will happen in the future

prophecy

noun
proph·​e·​cy | \ ˈprä-fə-sē How to pronounce prophecy (audio) \
plural prophecies

Kids Definition of prophecy

1 : something foretold : prediction
2 : the ability to predict what will happen in the future

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Comments on prophecy

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