propagandist

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noun

pro·​pa·​gan·​dist ˌprä-pə-ˈgan-dist How to pronounce propagandist (audio)
ˌprō-
plural propagandists
: someone who produces or spreads propaganda : a person who spreads ideas, facts, or allegations deliberately to further a cause or to damage an opposing cause
left-wing/right-wing propagandists
From the mid-1860s on through the 1870s, Jesse had the help of a propagandist, a former Confederate major named John Newman Edwards, who switched to journalism and did all he could to promote Jesse as a kind of rebel knight errant.Larry McMurtry

propagandist

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adjective

variants or propagandistic
: of, relating to, or being propaganda : characterized by ideas, facts, or allegations spread deliberately to further a cause or to damage an opposing cause
propagandist rhetoric
propagandistic art
"… I like Jacques-Louis David a lot, too, although he was a propagandist painter. …"Bob Dylan
Accompanying text reported the outstanding political and economic achievements of the Party and detailed propagandistic speeches at length.Linda Jensen
Yes, this film is propagandist in nature, but is at the same time a documentary.Matt Campbell
propagandistically adverb

Examples of propagandist in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The use that anti-vaccine propagandists have made of the BMJ paper underscores the dangers of disinformation in public health today. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, 11 June 2024 Don’t Hype the Disinformation Threat Underplaying the risk helps foreign propagandists—but so does exaggerating it. Karen Donfried, Foreign Affairs, 10 June 2024 Inside the 2024 Paris Summer Olympics News and Analysis Seeking to undermine the Paris Olympics, Russian propagandists are spoofing broadcasters and mimicking French and U.S. intelligence agencies to stoke fear about security at the Games. Andrew Trunsky, New York Times, 8 June 2024 The panel was moderated by television host and prominent Putin propagandist Vladimir Soloviev. Radina Gigova, CNN, 8 June 2024 Pro-Putin propagandists 'want blood' Lockshin's film quickly surged to the top of Russia's box-office takings list – grossing more than 600 million rubles (£5.2 million) in its first week. Sorcha Bradley, The Week Uk, theweek, 20 Mar. 2024 His latest book, How to Win an Information War, revolves around the World War II activities of Sefton Delmer (1904–1979), a British propagandist dedicated not to preserving illusions but to whittling them away. Daniel Foster, National Review, 16 May 2024 On the surface, minimalism is not politically prescriptive, though the minimalists of the 1960s could be propagandists, too, using their platform to promote political causes. Adam Bradley, New York Times, 10 May 2024 Pictures of a mother clutching her baby, a young family cowering in a bomb shelter, and heroic Russian soldiers recall images of World War II, which Russian propagandists routinely use to legitimize the current conflict. Francesca Ebel, Washington Post, 15 Mar. 2024
Adjective
Stamps are also used for more expressly political or propagandist purposes. Andrea Valdez, The Atlantic, 28 Apr. 2024 Russia has relied on a litany of propagandist tactics to garner support and shield the reality of the war from its own population. Caitlin McFall, Fox News, 24 May 2022 Feeding a global market The propagandist war of words has mainly focused on the impact on vulnerable populations in the Global South. Fred Weir, The Christian Science Monitor, 18 July 2023 Anything but apolitical, Reagan-era action flicks like First Blood (1982) and Top Gun (1986) are too frankly propagandist to be allegories. J. Hoberman, The New Republic, 22 June 2023 The effect is chilling, with denunciations strongly encouraged by the state and news of arrests and prosecutions amplified by propagandist commentators on federal television stations and Telegram channels. Robyn Dixon, Washington Post, 27 May 2023 Karsten, who is also the department chair of anthropology at UW-Oshkosh, equated this week's invasions to the 1930s build-up to World War II, when Nazi Germany twisted the history of ethnic Germans living in Sudetenland, propagandist campaigns that led to the annexation of Czechoslovakia. Natalie Eilbert, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 24 Feb. 2022 Despite Putin’s efforts to restrict rights, his ability to control the narrative in Russia through propagandist tools has paid off. Caitlin McFall, Fox News, 1 Sep. 2022 To read or view the manipulative domestic coverage of the assault on Ukraine is to walk through a looking glass into a propagandist world of Russian heroes and Ukrainian nationalist villains. Washington Post, 8 Mar. 2022

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'propagandist.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

borrowed from French propagandiste, from propagande propaganda + -iste -ist entry 1

First Known Use

Noun

1792, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1824, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of propagandist was in 1792

Dictionary Entries Near propagandist

Cite this Entry

“Propagandist.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/propagandist. Accessed 24 Jun. 2024.

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