prolonged

adjective

pro·​longed prə-ˈlȯŋd How to pronounce prolonged (audio)
: continuing for a notably long time : extended in duration
a prolonged delay
a prolonged recession
a prolonged absence
a prolonged drought
And in today's competitive situation a prolonged strike can very easily lead to a serious loss of market share which is difficult, if not impossible, to recapture.David Reid
Sometimes the only answer is a prolonged time away from the sport followed by a slow, steady reconditioning program along with physiotherapy of some type …William J. Goldwag
prolongedly adverb
… and Andy demonstrates … the odd talent of coughing in his sleep, coughing prolongedly without waking himself. John Updike

Examples of prolonged in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Public sentiment toward the president and the ruling party has especially soured in the months leading up to the elections amid soaring food prices and a prolonged medical crisis. Se Eun Gong, NPR, 11 Apr. 2024 Negotiators have been trying to secure a prolonged truce in exchange for the more than 120 hostages still inside the enclave. Shannon K. Crawford, ABC News, 11 Apr. 2024 The last thing the global economy needs now is to have Germany, the world’s third-largest economy, go through a prolonged period of economic stagnation. Desmond Lachman, National Review, 10 Apr. 2024 Limited data suggests prolonged problems aren’t common. Evan Bush, NBC News, 9 Apr. 2024 As Miss Debbie Aguero wrapped up her latest 90 Day stint, she was met with tension and prolonged questioning by another Debbie — Debbie Johnson, or Colt Johnson’s mom. Kelly Wynne, Peoplemag, 9 Apr. 2024 There’s nothing so lovely as a prolonged vanishing. Rae Armantrout, The New Yorker, 8 Apr. 2024 Some parents want to shield really young kids from the news, which could be possible if the cancer treatments won't lead to noticeable changes – hair loss or fatigue or prolonged hospitalizations, for example. Marc Silver, NPR, 30 Mar. 2024 Just Blew One Up In Eastern Ukraine Increased Competition The prolonged era of low-interest rates catalyzed the influx of traditional lenders and non-traditional players entering the private credit market, which amplified the level of competition. Christian Oberbeck, Forbes, 28 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'prolonged.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

circa 1525, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of prolonged was circa 1525

Dictionary Entries Near prolonged

Cite this Entry

“Prolonged.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prolonged. Accessed 22 Apr. 2024.

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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