progeria

noun
pro·​ge·​ria | \ prō-ˈjir-ē-ə How to pronounce progeria (audio) \

Definition of progeria

: a rare genetic disorder of childhood marked by slowed physical growth and characteristic signs (such as baldness, wrinkled skin, and atherosclerosis) of rapid aging with death usually occurring around puberty

Examples of progeria in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Like progeria, Huntington's disease is considered fatal, according to the Huntington Disease Society of America. Fox News, "New gene-editing technology could help treat Huntington's disease, premature aging, study says," 29 Aug. 2019 Most children with progeria die of hardening of the arteries, a common killer of the elderly, at an average age of just 14. Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe, STAT, "College student with disease that causes premature aging is heartened by medical advances," 25 Feb. 2020 In the testing, scientists used SATI to correct the gene that is responsible for progeria in mice. Fox News, "New gene-editing technology could help treat Huntington's disease, premature aging, study says," 29 Aug. 2019 Within a few weeks, the progression of symptoms in the mice with progeria began to slow down. Eva Frederick, Science | AAAS, "Poop transplants can help prematurely old mice live longer," 29 July 2019 The species was more common in centenarians, and low in mice with progeria. Eva Frederick, Science | AAAS, "Poop transplants can help prematurely old mice live longer," 29 July 2019 At the Salk Institute for Genetic Expression, in La Jolla, California, scientists tweaked epigenetic markers in live mice with progeria, a disease of premature aging, to revert adult cells back into their embryonic state. Marcia Desanctis, Vogue, "Can the Genes Responsible for Aging Be Altered by a Face Cream? These Skin-Care Companies Say Yes," 21 July 2018 That’s according to small, preliminary study in 27 kids with progeria. Washington Post, "Kids with rare rapid-aging disease get hope from study drug," 24 Apr. 2018 Children with progeria live an average of 14 years. Jonathan Saltzman, BostonGlobe.com, "A pediatric researcher whose son died of progeria sees promise in new treatment," 24 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'progeria.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of progeria

1904, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for progeria

Greek progḗrōs "prematurely old" (from pro- pro- entry 1 + -gērōs, adjective derivative from the stem of gḗras "old age") + -ia entry 1 — more at geriatric entry 2

Note: The term progeria was introduced by the British surgeon Hastings Gilford (1861-1941) in "Progeria: a form of senilism," The Practioner, vol. 73 (August, 1904), pp. 188-217. According to the author, "it was this peculiar mixture of relative bigness and littleness, youth and old age, which suggested the word micromegaly, at first used as a provisional name for the disease. But it is obvious that the most conspicuous feature is that of premature senile decay, and the name progeria, for which I am indebted to Mr. James Rhoades [1841-1923, Anglo-Irish poet and schoolmaster] and Professor Arthur Sidgwick [1840-1920, Oxford classicist], is not only a far better word, but it is a true description of the distinguishing features of the two cases" (p. 210).

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The first known use of progeria was in 1904

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Cite this Entry

“Progeria.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/progeria. Accessed 25 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for progeria

progeria

noun
pro·​ge·​ria | \ prō-ˈjir-ē-ə How to pronounce progeria (audio) \

Medical Definition of progeria

: a rare genetic disorder of childhood marked by slowed physical growth and characteristic signs (as baldness, wrinkled skin, and atherosclerosis) of rapid aging with death usually occurring during puberty

More from Merriam-Webster on progeria

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about progeria

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