presumption

noun
pre·​sump·​tion | \ pri-ˈzəm(p)-shən \

Definition of presumption

1 : presumptuous attitude or conduct : audacity
2a : an attitude or belief dictated by probability : assumption
b : the ground, reason, or evidence lending probability to a belief
3 : a legal inference as to the existence or truth of a fact not certainly known that is drawn from the known or proved existence of some other fact

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of presumption in a Sentence

The trial was unfair from the beginning because there was no presumption of innocence. a defendant's right to a presumption of innocence

Recent Examples on the Web

Though Chuck Schumer apparently said that that's not -- there's no presumption of innocence in the Senate, that's on American. Fox News, "Kavanaugh's high school friend reacts to fiery testimony," 28 Sep. 2018 There is still a presumption of dangerousness and guilt that gets assigned to black and brown people. Kurtis Lee, latimes.com, "'Capital punishment is the stepchild of lynching.' Here's what Bryan Stevenson hopes to address with a memorial honoring black people who were killed," 26 Apr. 2018 There’s something slightly Trumpian to the presumption that one’s own ignorance of a subject extends to the rest of the world. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "‘Like Floating Through a Library’: An Interview with Nick Paumgarten," 7 May 2018 Critics, like the Kentucky Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, worry about the courts granting legal status to a victim when the judicial system — which is rooted in the presumption of innocence — has yet to determine if a crime took place. Adam Beam, The Seattle Times, "Kentucky judge blocks certification of ‘Marsy’s Law’ vote," 15 Oct. 2018 So, Susan Collins and this whole notion of presumption of innocence. Eric Johnson, Recode, "When big companies are hacked, should they have to disclose it immediately?," 13 Oct. 2018 Why go into a job where this was the presumption of me? Eric Johnson, Recode, "‘The Front Runner’ director Jason Reitman says technology has taught today’s young people how to be great filmmakers," 1 Nov. 2018 The presumptions and assumptions abound about Muslim-ness and Islam—but only when the perpetrator is presumed to be doing something bad. H.a. Hellyer, Time, "The Mali 'Spider-Man' Was Offered French Citizenship. What About the Muslim Migrants Who Aren't Superheroes?," 30 May 2018 Research does not benefit from any presumption of methodological innocence. The Economist, "The e-pistles of PaulPaul Romer quits after an embarrassing row," 25 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'presumption.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of presumption

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for presumption

Middle English presumpcioun, from Anglo-French presumption, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin praesumption-, praesumptio presumptuous attitude, from Latin, assumption, from praesumere

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about presumption

Share presumption

Statistics for presumption

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for presumption

The first known use of presumption was in the 13th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for presumption

presumption

noun

English Language Learners Definition of presumption

: a belief that something is true even though it has not been proved

law : an act of accepting that something is true until it is proved not true

: willingness to do something without the right or permission to do it

presumption

noun
pre·​sump·​tion | \ pri-ˈzəmp-shən \

Kids Definition of presumption

1 : behavior or attitude going beyond what is proper
2 : a strong reason for believing something to be so
3 : something believed to be so but not proved

presumption

noun
pre·​sump·​tion | \ pri-ˈzəmp-shən \

Legal Definition of presumption

: an inference as to the existence of a fact not certainly known that the law requires to be drawn from the known or proven existence of some other fact
conclusive presumption
: a presumption that the law does not allow to be rebutted

called also irrebuttable presumption

— compare rebuttable presumption in this entry
mandatory presumption
: a presumption that a jury is required by law to make upon proof of a given fact — compare permissive presumption in this entry
permissive presumption
: an inference or presumption that a jury is allowed but not required to make from a given set of facts

called also permissive inference

— compare mandatory presumption in this entry
presumption of fact
: a presumption founded on a previous experience or on general knowledge of a connection between a known fact and one inferred from it
presumption of innocence
: a rebuttable presumption in the favor of the defendant in a criminal action imposing on the prosecution the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt
presumption of intent
: a permissive presumption that if a criminal defendant committed an act it was his or her intent to commit it
presumption of law
: a presumption (as of the innocence of a criminal defendant) founded on a rule or policy of law regardless of fact
presumption of survivorship
: the presumption in the absence of direct evidence that of two or more persons dying in a common disaster (as a fire) one was the last to die because of youth, strength, or other reasons rendering survivorship likely
rebuttable presumption
: a presumption that may be rebutted by evidence to the contrary — compare conclusive presumption in this entry

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on presumption

What made you want to look up presumption? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

tremendous in size, volume, or degree

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Homophone Quiz

  • three-bears-two-of-them-look-like-theyre-whispering-to-a-third-bear-who-looks-chuffed-to-be-the-center-of-attention
  • In order to judge how people felt, the senator's office hired a firm to take a ______.
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!