prelate

noun
prel·​ate | \ ˈpre-lət How to pronounce prelate (audio) also ˈprē-ˌlāt \

Definition of prelate

: an ecclesiastic (such as a bishop or abbot) of superior rank

Examples of prelate in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Cardinal Becciu seemed a prelate on the rise in the Francis pontificate, often traveling with the pope. Jason Horowitz, New York Times, "Powerful Cardinal, a Fixture of Vatican Intrigue, Resigns Suddenly," 24 Sep. 2020 According to his canonization, St. Stanislaus, an 11th-century prelate who expanded Catholicism in Poland, resurrected a dead witness to win a dispute over money with the king. Lydia Depillis, cleveland, "The big corporate rescue and the America that’s too small to save," 12 Sep. 2020 According to his canonization, St. Stanislaus, an 11th-century prelate who expanded Catholicism in Poland, resurrected a dead witness to win a dispute over money with the king. Lydia Depillis, ProPublica, "The Big Corporate Rescue and the America That’s Too Small to Save," 12 Sep. 2020 The two prelates were the same Vatican officials who went to Chile in 2018 to investigate one case of abuse cover-up and returned to Rome with testimony from more than 60 victims that filled a 2,600-page dossier. Maria Verza, Washington Post, "Vatican halts Mexico abuse prevention mission, cites virus," 6 Mar. 2020 Among the Vatican’s confirmed cases is an Italian prelate who lives at a Vatican hotel where Francis resides. BostonGlobe.com, "Spain in near-lockdown, on the verge of crisis," 27 Mar. 2020 Francis said Wednesday after shaking hands with prelates and the faithful in the front rows of a crowd in which few people wore masks. Jason Horowitz, New York Times, "Fear of Coronavirus Leaves the Faithful Without Mass in Italy’s North," 1 Mar. 2020 Pope John Paul II named him a prelate of honor in 1998. al, "Pope assigns new bishop to Diocese of Birmingham," 25 Mar. 2020 Sarah is a Guinean prelate of the Catholic Church and has been a cardinal since 2010. Carlin Becker, Washington Examiner, "'Cannot remain silent': Vatican scrambles to defuse controversy over Pope Emeritus Benedict opposition to married priests," 14 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'prelate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of prelate

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for prelate

Middle English prelat, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin praelatus, literally, one receiving preferment, from Latin (past participle of praeferre to prefer), from prae- + latus, past participle of ferre to carry — more at tolerate, bear

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Time Traveler for prelate

Time Traveler

The first known use of prelate was in the 13th century

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Last Updated

4 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Prelate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prelate. Accessed 21 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for prelate

prelate

noun
How to pronounce prelate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of prelate

formal : a high-ranking Christian priest : a bishop, cardinal, etc.

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