postcolonial

adjective
post·​co·​lo·​nial | \ ˌpōst-kə-ˈlō-nē-əl How to pronounce postcolonial (audio) , -nyəl \

Definition of postcolonial

: of, relating to, or being a time after colonialism postcolonial America Carter was the first American president to take seriously the entire postcolonial era that has remade the globe since World War II.— Garry Wills

Examples of postcolonial in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web So with a vote share that would make a dictator grin (99.2 percent), John Lee became the fifth person selected to lead the city in the postcolonial era. Timothy Mclaughlin, The Atlantic, 25 May 2022 Queen Elizabeth’s reign has seen the ascension of curry from exotic fare to British national cuisine, echoing the changing awareness and identity of Britain from empire to postcolonial state. Shafi Musaddique, The Christian Science Monitor, 3 June 2022 To those who share this perspective, an unpredictable America at the helm of the liberal West is a greater threat to the independence of many postcolonial states than Russian or even Chinese ambition could ever be. Walter Russell Mead, WSJ, 21 Mar. 2022 Self-flagellating postcolonial studies might have paralyzed Western cultural discourse, but in Russia such self-scrutiny is virtually nonexistent. Melik Kaylan, WSJ, 24 Mar. 2022 These tweets, along with thousands of others, became part of a study on Twitter conversations in South Africa and Kenya during the early days of the pandemic that highlighted enduring postcolonial issues of race and power. Maxine Betteridge-moes, Quartz, 16 Mar. 2022 And the trial has touched only lightly on the vexed issue of whether, as happened often in postcolonial Africa, foreign powers had a hand in the young leader’s death. New York Times, 9 Mar. 2022 One of the government’s other favored tactics is to apply the country’s sedition law, a remnant of British colonialism that has been repurposed by other postcolonial governments as a means of stifling dissent. Yasmeen Serhan, The Atlantic, 9 Dec. 2021 Friendship groups were multiethnic, the researchers noted, and often included children who spoke a language other than English at home, or children whose first language was English of a postcolonial variety, such as Ghanaian or Indian English. Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker, 6 Feb. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'postcolonial.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of postcolonial

1883, in the meaning defined above

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The first known use of postcolonial was in 1883

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Dictionary Entries Near postcolonial

postcollegiate

postcolonial

postcommissural

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Last Updated

23 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Postcolonial.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/postcolonial. Accessed 2 Jul. 2022.

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