pogrom

noun
po·​grom | \ pə-ˈgräm How to pronounce pogrom (audio) , -ˈgrəm, pō-; ˈpō-grəm, ˈpä- How to pronounce pogrom (audio) \

Definition of pogrom

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an organized massacre of helpless people specifically : such a massacre of Jews

pogrom

verb
pogromed; pogroming; pogroms

Definition of pogrom (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to massacre or destroy in a pogrom

Examples of pogrom in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Jews had lived there for centuries, mostly in harmony with their neighbors, but growing Arab nationalism and anti-Zionist sentiment, including a 1941 pogrom in which several hundred Jews were killed, were making their situation precarious. New York Times, "Shlomo Hillel, Who Helped 120,000 Jews Flee Iraq, Dies at 97," 21 Feb. 2021 The first large group of Jewish prisoners was brought there in 1938 after the Night of Broken Glass, or Kristallnacht, anti-Semitic pogrom. David Rising, Star Tribune, "Former Nazi guard, age 100, charged as accessory to murder," 9 Feb. 2021 Former Congressman Steve King, R-Iowa, a fringe figure on the right, compared the censorship by Big Tech to Kristallnacht, the Nazi German pogrom against Jews that historians view as a prelude to the Holocaust. Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner, "How Trump's ban opened Pandora's Box," 12 Jan. 2021 CNN International anchor Christiane Amanpour issued an apology for comparing the Trump administration to Kristallnacht, the 1938 pogrom that occurred in Germany and Austria and became a precursor to the Holocaust. Mike Brest, Washington Examiner, "'Hitler and his evils stand alone': CNN's Christiane Amanpour regrets comparing Trump administration to Kristallnacht," 17 Nov. 2020 His mother had seen her mother slain in a Cossack pogrom in a Jewish village in Ukraine. Robert D. Mcfadden, New York Times, "Seymour Topping, Former Times Journalist and Eyewitness to History, Dies at 98," 8 Nov. 2020 Following the Kristallnacht pogrom of 1938 in which the small store the family owned was ransacked and their building attacked by the Nazis, her mother managed to get her sister out of Germany on the Kindertransport to England. Sergio Carmona, sun-sentinel.com, "Holocaust survivor’s 100th birthday celebrates triumph over tragedy," 2 Oct. 2020 Herschel and Sarah have barely exchanged their traditional wedding vows when Russian Cossacks destroy the town in a pogrom. David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter, "'An American Pickle': Film Review," 3 Aug. 2020 Even more violence resulting in a mini Muslim pogrom in February. Shikha Dalmia, TheWeek, "What makes America exceptional," 2 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pogrom.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pogrom

Noun

1891, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1915, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for pogrom

Noun

Yiddish, from Russ, literally, devastation

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Statistics for pogrom

Last Updated

12 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Pogrom.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pogrom. Accessed 11 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for pogrom

pogrom

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pogrom

: the organized killing of many helpless people usually because of their race or religion

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