periodontal

adjective
peri·​odon·​tal | \ ˌper-ē-ō-ˈdän-tᵊl How to pronounce periodontal (audio) \

Definition of periodontal

1 : investing or surrounding a tooth
2 : of or affecting periodontal tissues or regions periodontal diseases

Other Words from periodontal

periodontally \ ˌper-​ē-​ō-​ˈdän-​tᵊl-​ē How to pronounce periodontal (audio) \ adverb

Dentists and Periodontal Problems

In dentistry, cavities are important but they aren't the whole story; what happens to your gums is every bit as vital to your dental health. When you don't floss regularly to keep plaque from forming on your teeth and gums, the gums will slowly deteriorate. Dentists called periodontists specialize in the treatment of periodontal problems, and when the gums have broken down to the point where they can't hold the teeth in place a periodontist may need to provide dental implants, a costly and unpleasant process. But even a periodontist can't keep your gums healthy; that job is up to you.

Examples of periodontal in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The athletes also tended to have deeper pockets between the teeth and gums, which is a warning sign of periodontal disease. Alex Hutchinson, Outside Online, 25 Mar. 2022 Her lost teeth, the officials said, were simply the result of periodontal disease. Washington Post, 9 Feb. 2022 In mouse studies, for instance, the drug has improved immune system and heart function and reversed periodontal disease and cognitive decline. Ron Winslow, WSJ, 11 Jan. 2022 The second group has had an increase in dental caries (cavities), periodontal (gum) disease, and tooth grinding. Rachel King, Fortune, 18 Dec. 2021 Nearly 50% of Americans have some type of periodontal disease, which includes gingivitis in its earlier stages, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Korin Miller, Health.com, 8 June 2021 High amounts of this in your system can cause weight gain, hypertension, periodontal issues, and changes in blood pressure, among other things. Lynn Saladino, Health.com, 22 Apr. 2021 Studies suggest a relationship between periodontal disease—the term for disease of the gums and bone structures supporting the teeth—and the inflammation that can precede heart attacks and strokes. Laura Landro, WSJ, 11 Apr. 2021 Most dogs have some form of periodontal disease by age 3, which can have health consequences that go beyond their mouths. Christina Vercelletto, CNN Underscored, 10 Mar. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'periodontal.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of periodontal

1854, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for periodontal

Time Traveler

The first known use of periodontal was in 1854

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Dictionary Entries Near periodontal

periodograph

periodontal

periodontal membrane

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Statistics for periodontal

Last Updated

29 Mar 2022

Cite this Entry

“Periodontal.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/periodontal. Accessed 18 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for periodontal

periodontal

adjective
peri·​odon·​tal | \ ˌper-ē-ō-ˈdänt-ᵊl How to pronounce periodontal (audio) \

Medical Definition of periodontal

1 : investing or surrounding a tooth
2 : of or affecting the periodontium periodontal infection

Other Words from periodontal

periodontally \ -​ᵊl-​ē How to pronounce periodontal (audio) \ adverb

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