pastiche

noun
pas·​tiche | \ pa-ˈstēsh, pä-\

Definition of pastiche

1 : a literary, artistic, musical, or architectural work that imitates the style of previous work His building designs are pastiches based on classical forms. also : such stylistic imitation
2a : a musical, literary, or artistic composition made up of selections from different works : potpourri The research paper was essentially a pastiche made up of passages from different sources.
b : hodgepodge The house is decorated in a pastiche of Asian styles.

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from pastiche

pasticheur \ ˌpa-​stē-​ˈshər , ˌpä-​ \ noun

Did You Know?

It all began with macaroni. Our word pastiche is from French, but the French word was in turn borrowed from Italian, where the word is pasticcio. Pasticcio is what the Italians called a kind of "macaroni pie" (from the word pasta). English-speakers familiar with this multilayered dish had begun to apply the name to various sorts of potpourris or hodgepodges (musical, literary, or otherwise) by the 18th century. For over a hundred years English speakers were happy with pasticcio, until we discovered the French word pastiche sometime in the latter part of the 1800s. Although we still occasionally use pasticcio in its extended meaning, "pastiche" is now much more common.

Examples of pastiche in a Sentence

His earlier building designs were pastiches based on classical forms. With this work she goes beyond pastiche. The research paper was essentially a pastiche made up of passages from different sources. The house is decorated in a pastiche of Asian styles.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

This is not to say that all Mr. Geary’s pastiches are first-rate. Henry Hitchings, WSJ, "‘Wit’s End’ Review: You’ve Got to Be Kidding," 8 Nov. 2018 On one plane, there’s Hannaford’s film, a kind of dreamy pastiche of European art cinema seemingly inspired in equal parts by Last Year at Marienbad, Persona, and Michelangelo Antonioni. Keith Phipps, The Verge, "Netflix’s Orson Welles revival is strange, fascinating, and frustrating," 1 Nov. 2018 The last thing Godard's fertile '60s period ever felt like was a mannered checklist of film's possibilities, but Hazanavicius has no such qualms as a pastiche fanboy. Robert Abele, latimes.com, "'Godard Mon Amour' isn't as smart or funny a sendup as it wants to be," 19 Apr. 2018 Shapely melody is not Mr. Finn’s strong suit, and his score, in which Great American Songbook-style pastiche is freshened with his own spiky harmonic language, is somewhat uneven in quality. Terry Teachout, WSJ, "‘The Royal Family of Broadway’ Review: The Farcical Ties That Bind," 14 June 2018 Some newer artists even exist almost solely as Three 6 pastiche acts, including $uicideboy$, whose WhoSampled page lists dozens of flips of old Memphis classics. Patrick Lyons, Billboard, "10 Years Ago, Three 6 Mafia's 'Last 2 Walk' Almost Ruined Their Legacy," 24 June 2018 Attempts to recreate the building now would amount to a pastiche or replica, not a restoration, and Mackintosh was an innovator, not an antiquarian. The Economist, "A burnt-out case," 21 June 2018 This was, in other words, no pastiche of multi-cultural influences. Howard Reich, chicagotribune.com, "Chicago Jazz Philharmonic delivers urgent message with 'Chicago Immigrant Stories'," 15 June 2018 The result of style’s decline is visible in the McMansion, a house too large in volume for its lot, with a pastiche of stylistic elements decorating the exterior. Anthony Alofsin, The Atlantic, "A Defense of the Suburbs," 6 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pastiche.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of pastiche

1866, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for pastiche

French, from Italian pasticcio

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about pastiche

Listen to Our Podcast about pastiche

Statistics for pastiche

Last Updated

7 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for pastiche

The first known use of pastiche was in 1866

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for pastiche

pastiche

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pastiche

: something (such as a piece of writing, music, etc.) that imitates the style of someone or something else

: a piece of writing, music, etc., that is made up of selections from different works

: a mixture of different things

More from Merriam-Webster on pastiche

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for pastiche

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about pastiche

Comments on pastiche

What made you want to look up pastiche? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

to settle judicially or to act as judge

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Homophone Quiz

  • three-bears-two-of-them-look-like-theyre-whispering-to-a-third-bear-who-looks-chuffed-to-be-the-center-of-attention
  • In order to judge how people felt, the senator's office hired a firm to take a ______.
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Bee Cubed

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!