parody

noun
par·o·dy | \ˈper-ə-dē, ˈpa-rə-\
plural parodies

Definition of parody 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a literary or musical work in which the style of an author or work is closely imitated for comic effect or in ridicule wrote a hilarious parody of a popular song

2 : a feeble or ridiculous imitation a cheesy parody of a classic western

parody

verb
parodied; parodying

Definition of parody (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to compose a parody on parody a poem

2 : to imitate in the manner of a parody

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Other Words from parody

Noun

parodic \pə-ˈrä-dik, pa- \ adjective
parodistic \ˌper-ə-ˈdi-stik, ˌpa-rə- \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for parody

Noun

caricature, burlesque, parody, travesty mean a comic or grotesque imitation. caricature implies ludicrous exaggeration of the characteristic features of a subject. caricatures of politicians in cartoons burlesque implies mockery especially through giving a serious or lofty subject a frivolous treatment. a nightclub burlesque of a trial in court parody applies especially to treatment of a trivial or ludicrous subject in the exactly imitated style of a well-known author or work. a witty parody of a popular novel travesty implies that the subject remains unchanged but that the style is extravagant or absurd. this production is a travesty of the opera

Examples of parody in a Sentence

Noun

He has a talent for writing parodies. a writer with a talent for parody

Verb

It was easy to parody the book's fancy language. She parodied her brother's poetry.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The actors' voices are capable and their improvised asides clever, but punchlines feel thrown away, without the campiness necessary for a truly successful parody. Marissa Oberlander, Chicago Reader, "Wild Women of Planet Wongo," 21 June 2018 Horror movies wear off, because people stop being afraid of the same things over and over, and those things become ripe for parody. San Francisco Chronicle, "Do comic superheroes like Deadpool signal the end of the superhero genre?," 14 June 2018 Dhananjay got his start on YouTube making parody videos of popular R&B songs, which attracted the attention of filmmaker Geremy Jasper who cast him in his coming-of-age rap story that was picked up by Fox Searchlight out of the Utah festival. Mia Galuppo, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Patti Cake$' Actor Siddharth Dhananjay Signs With APA," 12 July 2018 Netflix’s surprisingly brilliant true crime parody American Vandal was overlooked despite boasting a rabid fandom. Eliana Dockterman, Time, "The Biggest Snubs and Surprises of the 2018 Emmy Nominations," 12 July 2018 The Fedex driver’s original intent for the parody clip was simply to amuse family and friends. Meghan Overdeep, Southern Living, "Experts Agree: This South Carolina Man’s Way of Telling If There’s a Shark in the Water Is 100% Accurate," 11 July 2018 Even a convincing pseudoscience parody would have its cover blown coming from an official McGill account. Brian Barrett, WIRED, "A ‘Cancer Cure’ Video Skewered Bad Science—and Went Viral Itself," 10 July 2018 There were dozens of versions of the lyrics, including a powerful parody by an abolitionist writer. Joss Fong, Vox, "A debate on the merits of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”," 4 July 2018 When asked about the viral parody letters, a spokesman for Burns said the filmmaker was unavailable for comment. Amy B Wang, Washington Post, "‘No place to recharge my Kindle’: Letters imagine the front lines of America’s ‘second civil war’," 3 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

For those who dream of seeing the day-to-day lives of the Royal family, check out The Windsors, a British series that parodies the royal family soap opera style. Mahita Gajanan, Time, "The Best Shows and Movies to Watch on Netflix Before Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Royal Wedding," 7 May 2018 Armstrong wrote on his verified Twitter account, parodying a similar tweet from Musk about Tesla’s weekly output. Bloomberg, latimes.com, "Musk declares Tesla 'just became a real car company.' But can it keep building Model 3 vehicles at this pace?," 2 July 2018 From talk radio to Fox News to Breitbart, alternative public spheres coalesced as echo chambers, where climate science could be regularly parried and parodied and conservative precepts about government overreach perpetually reinforced. Christopher Sellers, Vox, "How Republicans came to embrace anti-environmentalism," 6 July 2018 The Onion started in 1988 as a student-run publication at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and grew to national prominence by parodying newspapers with satirical headlines and stories. Robert Channick, chicagotribune.com, "Univision looks to sell The Onion, Gizmodo websites," 11 July 2018 The rhetorical overkill used to describe a mediocre but well-intentioned presidency was so over-the-top it was parodied in a famous Simpsons bit: Carter was a Republican bogeyman in 1988, and when Bill Clinton came along. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Poll: Barack Obama Was the Greatest President of Our Lifetime," 11 July 2018 In a meta twist, the way the various revelations are parceled out in episodes of The Staircase has made the series a cultural touchstone in its own right, to the point where it was parodied in an NBC sitcom starring John Lithgow. Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "The Queasy Verdict of The Staircase," 26 June 2018 Co-hosts Josh Groban and Sara Bareilles kicked the show off with a self-parodying duet on piano for all the losers out there — including them. Mark Kennedy, Sun-Sentinel.com, "'The Band's Visit' dances away with a leading 10 Tony Awards," 11 June 2018 The six-member group parodied heterosexual male culture by dressing up as cultural icons. Johnny Miller, SFChronicle.com, "Iwo Jima bids adieu to U.S. flag," 20 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'parody.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of parody

Noun

1607, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1733, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for parody

Noun

Latin parodia, from Greek parōidia, from para- + aidein to sing — more at ode

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Statistics for parody

Last Updated

13 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for parody

The first known use of parody was in 1607

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More Definitions for parody

parody

noun

English Language Learners Definition of parody

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of writing, music, etc., that imitates the style of someone or something else in an amusing way

: a bad or unfair example of something

parody

verb

English Language Learners Definition of parody (Entry 2 of 2)

: to imitate (someone or something) in an amusing way

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Comments on parody

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