paradox

noun
par·​a·​dox | \ ˈper-ə-ˌdäks How to pronounce paradox (audio) , ˈpa-rə-\

Definition of paradox

1 : a tenet contrary to received opinion
2a : a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true
b : a self-contradictory statement that at first seems true
c : an argument that apparently derives self-contradictory conclusions by valid deduction from acceptable premises
3 : one (such as a person, situation, or action) having seemingly contradictory qualities or phases

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Did You Know?

The ancient Greeks were well aware that a paradox can take us outside our usual way of thinking. They combined the prefix para- ("beyond" or "outside of") with the verb dokein ("to think"), forming paradoxos, an adjective meaning "contrary to expectation." Latin speakers picked up the word and used it to create their noun paradoxum, which English speakers borrowed during the 1500s to create paradox.

Examples of paradox in a Sentence

For the actors, the goal was a paradox: real emotion, produced on cue. — Claudia Roth Pierpont, New Yorker, 27 Oct. 2008 Again and again, he returns in his writing to the paradox of a woman who is superior to the men around her by virtue of social class though considered inferior to them on account of her gender. — Terry Eagleton, Harper's, November 2007 She was certainly far from understanding him completely; his meaning was not at all times obvious. It was hard to see what he meant for instance by speaking of his provincial side—which was exactly the side she would have taken him most to lack. Was it a harmless paradox, intended to puzzle her? or was it the last refinement of high culture? — Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady, 1881 Mr. Guppy propounds for Mr. Smallweed's consideration the paradox that the more you drink the thirstier you are and reclines his head upon the window-sill in a state of hopeless languor. — Charles Dickens, Bleak House, 1852-53 It is a paradox that computers need maintenance so often, since they are meant to save people time. As an actor, he's a paradox—he loves being in the public eye but also deeply values and protects his privacy. a novel full of paradox
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Recent Examples on the Web

In what seemed like paradox, some of Bouteflika’s top supporters welcomed the general’s proposal, while opposition parties railed against it. Aomar Ouali, The Seattle Times, "Algerian army chief calls for president to be declared unfit," 26 Mar. 2019 Most Read Business Stories The paradox is that strengthening ACA or going further is a potentially winning issue for Democrats in 2020, but the lobbying strength of the health-care industry will try to prevent reform. Jon Talton, The Seattle Times, "Trump’s gambit to kill Obamacare risks lives and opportunity," 29 Mar. 2019 The paradox of Donald Trump’s Presidency after two years is that his main successes are the result of traditional Republican policies. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Trump’s Re-Election Challenge," 4 Feb. 2019 John Yossarian, a young pilot in World War II who struggles with the violence of war and the Catch-22 paradox that prevents him from leaving his duty. Maggie Maloney, Town & Country, "The First Trailer for George Clooney's New Series Catch-22 Is Finally Here," 13 Feb. 2019 This kind of late-career employment woe is part of a paradox that is deepening the worst retirement shortfall in decades. Ruth Simon, WSJ, "‘Just Unbearable.’ Booming Job Market Can’t Fill the Retirement Shortfall," 20 Dec. 2018 Israel’s technological paradox goes to the heart of its culture. Felicia Schwartz, WSJ, "What’s the Hot Device in Startup Nation? The Fax Machine," 21 Feb. 2019 These works speak to the paradox of the Soviet Union during its early decades, when Utopianism went hand-in-hand with manipulation. Anne Tschida, miamiherald, "The Power of Propaganda," 22 June 2018 Getty ImagesMark Cuthbert Birthdays are a bit of a paradox. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "Kate Middleton Will Spend Part of Her Birthday Away from Prince William," 5 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'paradox.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of paradox

1540, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for paradox

Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxon, from neuter of paradoxos contrary to expectation, from para- + dokein to think, seem — more at decent

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Dictionary Entries near paradox

paradontal

parador

parados

paradox

paradoxal

paradoxer

paradoxial

Statistics for paradox

Last Updated

21 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for paradox

The first known use of paradox was in 1540

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More Definitions for paradox

paradox

noun

English Language Learners Definition of paradox

: something (such as a situation) that is made up of two opposite things and that seems impossible but is actually true or possible
: someone who does two things that seem to be opposite to each other or who has qualities that are opposite
: a statement that seems to say two opposite things but that may be true

paradox

noun
par·​a·​dox | \ ˈper-ə-ˌdäks How to pronounce paradox (audio) \

Kids Definition of paradox

1 : a statement that seems to say opposite things and yet is perhaps true
2 : a person or thing having qualities that seem to be opposite

paradox

noun
par·​a·​dox | \ ˈpar-ə-ˌdäks How to pronounce paradox (audio) \

Medical Definition of paradox

: an instance of a paradoxical phenomenon or reaction

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