outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations— Anthony West
2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers— William Shakespeare
b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity— John Buchan
3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape
b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance— John Braine
2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

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Synonyms for outrage

Synonyms: Noun

affront, barb, brickbat, cut, dart, dig, dis (also diss) [slang], epithet, gird, indignity, insult, name, offense (or offence), personality, poke, put-down, sarcasm, slap, slight, slur

Synonyms: Verb

affront, dis (also diss) [slang], disrespect, insult, offend, slap, slight, wound

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Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun

Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue.

Verb

His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Global outrage over the fires has spurred calls to boycott Brazilian products and led European leaders to threaten to walk away from a trade agreement that the European Union struck with Brazil and a handful of neighboring countries in June. New York Times, "As Amazon Fires Become Global Crisis, Brazil’s President Reverses Course," 23 Aug. 2019 The photos were circulated on social media, and district officials quickly condemned the student’s actions amid widespread outrage. Los Angeles Times, "After Nazi salute video, more racist videos emerge, roiling O.C. school," 21 Aug. 2019 The media attention and outrage over Homestead is entirely understandable. Ken Silverstein, The New Republic, "Shock Corridor," 19 Aug. 2019 Federal prosecutors in New York reopened the probe after investigative reporting by The Miami Herald stirred outrage over that plea bargain. Michael Balsamo, The Denver Post, "Jeffrey Epstein’s guards worked extreme OT shifts morning of death," 11 Aug. 2019 Federal prosecutors in New York reopened the probe after investigative reporting by The Miami Herald stirred outrage over that plea bargain. Michael R. Sisak, BostonGlobe.com, "Jeffrey Epstein dies in the dark, but abuse investigation carries on," 11 Aug. 2019 Federal prosecutors in New York reopened the probe after investigative reporting by The Miami Herald stirred outrage over that plea bargain. Michael R. Sisak, Twin Cities, "Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide in jail cell sparks federal probes," 10 Aug. 2019 Celebrities such as Mandy Moore, Constance Wu, George Takei, Rihanna, and Reese Witherspoon have expressed their prayers and outrage over the tragedies, insisting immediate change to gun laws. Eric Todisco, PEOPLE.com, "MLS Player Alejandro Bedoya Scores Goal and Then Demands Gun Control: 'Do Something Now!'," 5 Aug. 2019 His visit on Tuesday comes at a time when much of the political world is in outrage over his use of inflammatory rhetoric, namely his attacks on Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland. CBS News, "Trump leaves for Jamestown anniversary as he continues attacks on Elijah Cummings," 30 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Democrats have been outraged by the relocation, calling it an attack on science. Alan Rappeport, BostonGlobe.com, "Farmers’ frustration with Trump grows as US escalates China fight," 27 Aug. 2019 Parents were understandably outraged as this was a concert aimed pretty much solely at tweens. Ross Raihala, Twin Cities, "How Miley Cyrus and a shared love of music led to a friendship cut short by cancer," 23 Aug. 2019 The group is outraged that Beaumont Health CEO John Fox’s compensation increased 82% in 2017, to more than $5.6 million, according to tax documents. Anna Bauman, Detroit Free Press, "Beaumont workers, union members rally at Wayne hospital for fair contract," 17 July 2019 Perhaps upon seeing me — a uniformed flight attendant — lounging in a passenger seat, the woman was outraged by my apparent dereliction of duty. Elliott Hester, latimes.com, "That flight attendant in a passenger seat? He's not on duty so leave him alone," 1 July 2019 Other detainees could be outraged at the notion that the detention center let a detainee die without intervention and could spark threats of copycat hunger strikes, government attorneys argued. San Diego Union-Tribune, "ICE seeks permission to force feed detainee on hunger strike," 21 Aug. 2019 On one side, there was America’s youth, outraged by racial injustice and war in Vietnam. Mark Clague, The Conversation, "Fifty years ago, Jimi Hendrix’s Woodstock anthem expressed the hopes and fears of a nation," 14 Aug. 2019 More realistically, Democrats want average Americans watching at home to come away outraged by the president’s behavior. Republicans The status quo. Adam Goldman, New York Times, "Robert Mueller’s Testimony Is Tomorrow. Here’s What You Need to Know.," 23 July 2019 Meanwhile, conservatives outraged by the attacks against Ngo lambasted the city government. oregonlive.com, "Milkshake-makers in Portland protests say they got death threats after police warned of ‘quick-drying cement’," 3 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

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Dictionary Entries near outrage

output

output shaft

outrace

outrage

outrageous

outrager

outrance

Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

27 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for outrage

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong
: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act
2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.
2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Legal Definition of outrage

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act
2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

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More from Merriam-Webster on outrage

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with outrage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for outrage

Spanish Central: Translation of outrage

Nglish: Translation of outrage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of outrage for Arabic Speakers

Comments on outrage

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