oscillator

noun
os·​cil·​la·​tor | \ ˈä-sə-ˌlā-tər How to pronounce oscillator (audio) \

Definition of oscillator

1 : one that oscillates
2 : a device for producing alternating current especially : a radio-frequency or audio-frequency generator

Examples of oscillator in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

The goal is to put the oscillator in a quantum superposition of two vibration modes, and then see whether gravity destabilizes the superposition. Quanta Magazine, "Physicists Eye Quantum-Gravity Interface," 31 Oct. 2013 In an atomic clock, the frequency of the quartz oscillator is fine tuned to match the energy needed to pop electrons to a new energy level. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "How a Toaster-Sized Atomic Clock Could Pave the Way for Deep Space Exploration," 26 June 2019 Even oscillators that have different natural frequencies, when coupled, reach a compromise and oscillate in tandem. Natalie Wolchover, WIRED, "The Math of How Crickets, Starlings, and Neurons Sync Up," 7 Apr. 2019 Even oscillators that have different natural frequencies, when coupled, reach a compromise and oscillate in tandem. Quanta Magazine, "Scientists Discover Exotic New Patterns of Synchronization," 4 Apr. 2019 Ten years ago, the best optomechanical oscillators of the kind required for Bouwmeester’s experiment could wiggle back and forth 100,000 times without stopping. Quanta Magazine, "Physicists Eye Quantum-Gravity Interface," 31 Oct. 2013 The gadget, about the size of a toaster, uses charged mercury ions to keep its quartz oscillator true, and loses only about one nanosecond over four days. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "How a Toaster-Sized Atomic Clock Could Pave the Way for Deep Space Exploration," 26 June 2019 But that’s in essence what the teams of Gröblacher and Sillanpää have achieved with their tiny oscillators. Quanta Magazine, "Real-Life Schrödinger’s Cats Probe the Boundary of the Quantum World," 25 June 2018 In fact, Cornell University mathematician Steven Strogatz co-authored a 2005 Nature paper with McRobie and two others that modeled the dynamics of the Millennium Bridge as a weakly damped and driven harmonic oscillator. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "New study sheds more light on what caused Millennium Bridge to wobble," 30 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'oscillator.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of oscillator

1798, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Last Updated

16 Aug 2019

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Time Traveler for oscillator

The first known use of oscillator was in 1798

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More Definitions for oscillator

oscillator

noun
os·​cil·​la·​tor | \ ˈäs-ə-ˌlāt-ər How to pronounce oscillator (audio) \

Medical Definition of oscillator

: a device or mechanism for producing or controlling oscillations especially : one (as a radio-frequency generator) for producing an alternating current

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More from Merriam-Webster on oscillator

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with oscillator

Britannica English: Translation of oscillator for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about oscillator

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