operatic

adjective
op·​er·​at·​ic | \ ˌä-pə-ˈra-tik How to pronounce operatic (audio) \

Definition of operatic

1 : of or relating to opera
2 : grand, dramatic, or romantic in style or effect

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Other Words from operatic

operatically \ ˌä-​pə-​ˈra-​ti-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce operatically (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for operatic

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Examples of operatic in a Sentence

the fall of the scandal-ridden government seemed operatic in its scope and consequences
Recent Examples on the Web Twitter was flooded with complaints when the bridge made its operatic debut on a gusty June 5. Michael Cabanatuan, SFChronicle.com, "Golden Gate Bridge’s new hum louder than expected, officials explore options to fix handrails," 1 July 2020 Mardones was praised for his powerhouse voice, which some even compared to operatic in sound and range. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, "Benny Mardones, 'Into the Night' singer-songwriter, dies at 73," 29 June 2020 The operatic baritone and pianist Paul Sanchez perform pieces by African American composers, including a new work by Shawn Okpebholo in a live performance from Chicago’s Studebaker Theater. Matt Cooper, Los Angeles Times, "Frida Kahlo photos at Catalina Island Museum: Your weekend must-see," 27 June 2020 Kramer, his critics fairly noted, did risk setting gay people back in the public imagination by staging operatic violations of taboo on every few pages. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "Larry Kramer Knew That an Honest Debate Was a Rude One," 28 May 2020 Underneath the soap-operatic machinations of the plot, Straub skewers a certain slice of bourgeois upstate society here. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "A Beach Read With Teeth," 15 May 2020 This spring, Nottage was set to premiere a operatic imagining of her 2003 play about an early-20th-century seamstress in New York City. Vanessa Lawrence, ELLE Decor, "A Pulitzer Prize Winner Cooks Up a Storm With This Cast-Iron Skillet," 9 Apr. 2020 Bertolucci’s understanding of history is fundamentally Marxist, but his way of rendering it is operatic as well as dialectical, and always more sensual than dogmatic. New York Times, "A Five-Hour Crash Course in Italian History That’s Also Great Filmmaking," 6 May 2020 Some of it's pseudo-operatic, some of it's electronica. Gary Graff, Billboard, "Pete Townshend Talks New The Who Album & Avoiding Certain Songs In Their Catalog," 24 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'operatic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of operatic

1749, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for operatic

opera entry 2 + -atic, probably after dramatic

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Time Traveler for operatic

Time Traveler

The first known use of operatic was in 1749

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Statistics for operatic

Last Updated

4 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Operatic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/operatic. Accessed 13 Jul. 2020.

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More from Merriam-Webster on operatic

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for operatic

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with operatic

Spanish Central: Translation of operatic

Nglish: Translation of operatic for Spanish Speakers

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