newsreel

noun
news·​reel | \ˈnüz-ˌrēl, ˈnyüz-\

Definition of newsreel 

: a short movie dealing with current events

Examples of newsreel in a Sentence

old newsreels from World War II

Recent Examples on the Web

Greene said he was surprised at the extent of coverage of the rise of Nazism and the Holocaust in American newspapers, magazines, radio and newsreels. Meg Jones, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Yes, Milwaukee newspapers reported on the Holocaust. But was it fully understood?," 3 May 2018 Acting on behalf of her father King George VI, who was gravely ill at the time, Elizabeth gave Truman an ornate 18th-century ‘over mantle’ to hang above a fireplace in the White House, as Pathé newsreel from the time shows. Ciara Nugent, Time, "Here's How Every Meeting Between the Queen and a U.S. President Went," 12 July 2018 The newsreel was translated into 22 languages and sent to 64 countries. Lainey Seyler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Everything you want to know about Vel Phillips that's probably not in a history book," 18 Apr. 2018 While bits and pieces of congressional hearings back then had been shown on newsreels, the Kefauver hearings were the first time they were carried live across the country. Michael S. Rosenwald, Washington Post, "‘Real-life drama’: When a senator won an Emmy for grilling witnesses at a televised hearing," 10 Apr. 2018 Of course, the exhibit is solely focused on the pre WWII years of the late 1930s and early 1940s (complete with fascinating newsreels and cinema clips of WWII movies). Trudy Rubin, Philly.com, "New Holocaust Museum exhibit reminds of how U.S. rejected desperate refugees before | Trudy Rubin," 3 July 2018 Sadly, Kofmel never gets the chance to quiz Rozsa-Flores, relying instead on snippets of archive newsreel footage. Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Chris the Swiss': Film Review | Cannes 2018," 22 May 2018 The photos and movies were widely featured in newspapers, magazines, and newsreels. Courant Community, "Community News For The South Windsor Edition," 12 June 2018 As the German airship raged with fire, a radio announcer named Herb Morrison recorded the events onto a phonograph recording that wasn't part of the newsreels shot that day and only later was added to actual footage. Julie Hinds, Detroit Free Press, "Can tape of sobbing child detainees join shocking sounds, images that have shaped history?," 20 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'newsreel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of newsreel

1914, in the meaning defined above

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The first known use of newsreel was in 1914

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More Definitions for newsreel

newsreel

noun

English Language Learners Definition of newsreel

: a short film that reported the news and that was shown in theaters in the past

newsreel

noun
news·​reel | \ˈnüz-ˌrēl, ˈnyüz-\

Kids Definition of newsreel

: a short motion picture made in the past about events at that time

More from Merriam-Webster on newsreel

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with newsreel

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about newsreel

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