mold

1 of 5

noun (1)

plural molds
1
a
: a cavity in which a substance is shaped: such as
(1)
: a matrix for casting metal
a bullet mold
(2)
: a form in which food is given a decorative shape
b
: a molded object
2
a
b
: a fixed pattern : design
c
obsolete : an example to be followed
3
: distinctive nature or character : type
4
: the frame on or around which an object is constructed
5

mold

2 of 5

verb (1)

molded; molding; molds

transitive verb

1
: to knead or work (a material, such as dough or clay) into a desired consistency or shape
2
: to form in a mold
mold candles
3
: to determine or influence the quality or nature of
mold public opinion
4
: to give shape to
the wind molds the waves
5
: to fit the contours of
fitted skirts that mold the hips
6
: to ornament with molding or carving
molded picture frames
moldable adjective

mold

3 of 5

noun (2)

plural molds
1
: a superficial often woolly growth produced especially on damp or decaying organic matter or on living organisms by a fungus (as of the order Mucorales)
2
: a fungus that produces mold

mold

4 of 5

verb (2)

molded; molding; molds

intransitive verb

: to become moldy

mold

5 of 5

noun (3)

plural molds
1
: crumbling soft friable earth suited to plant growth : soil
especially : soil rich in humus compare leaf mold
2
dialectal British
a
: the surface of the earth : ground
b
: the earth of the burying ground
3
archaic : earth that is the substance of the human body
Be merciful, great Duke, to men of mold.William Shakespeare

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English, from Anglo-French molde, alteration of Old French modle, from Latin modulus, diminutive of modus measure — more at mete

Noun (2)

Middle English mowlde, perhaps alteration of mowle, from moulen to grow moldy, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Danish mul mold

Noun (3)

Middle English, from Old English molde; akin to Old High German molta soil, Latin molere to grind — more at meal

First Known Use

Noun (1)

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1530, in the meaning defined above

Noun (3)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of mold was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near mold

Cite this Entry

“Mold.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mold. Accessed 6 Feb. 2023.

Kids Definition

mold

1 of 5 noun
: light rich crumbly earth that contains decaying matter (as leaves)

mold

2 of 5 noun
1
: the frame on, around, or in which something is constructed or shaped
a candle mold
2
: something shaped in a mold
a mold of gelatin

mold

3 of 5 verb
1
: to work and press into shape
mold loaves of bread
2
: to form in a mold
3
: to determine or influence the character of
mold a child's mind
moldable adjective
molder noun

mold

4 of 5 verb
: to become moldy

mold

5 of 5 noun
1
: an often fuzzy surface growth of fungus especially on damp or decaying matter
2
: a fungus that produces mold

Medical Definition

mold

1 of 4 noun
variants or chiefly British mould
: a cavity in which a fluid or malleable substance is shaped

mold

2 of 4 transitive verb
variants or chiefly British mould
: to give shape to especially in a mold

mold

3 of 4 intransitive verb
variants or chiefly British mould
: to become moldy

mold

4 of 4 noun
variants or chiefly British mould
1
: a superficial often woolly growth produced by a fungus especially on damp or decaying organic matter or on living organisms
2
: a fungus (as of the order Mucorales) that produces mold

Geographical Definition

Mold

geographical name

town in northeastern Wales south-southwest of Liverpool, England population 10,000

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