mineral

1 of 2

noun

min·​er·​al
ˈmin-rəl,
ˈmi-nə- How to pronounce mineral (audio)
1
: ore
2
: an inorganic substance (as in the ash of calcined tissue)
3
obsolete : mine
4
: something neither animal nor vegetable
5
a
: a solid homogeneous crystalline chemical element or compound that results from the inorganic processes of nature
broadly : any of various naturally occurring homogeneous substances (such as stone, coal, salt, sulfur, sand, petroleum, water, or natural gas) obtained usually from the ground
b
: a synthetic substance having the chemical composition and crystalline form and properties of a naturally occurring mineral
6
minerals plural, British : mineral water

mineral

2 of 2

adjective

1
: of or relating to minerals
also : inorganic
2
: impregnated with mineral substances

Examples of mineral in a Sentence

Noun an adequate supply of vitamins and minerals
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Milk contains water, fat, protein, lactose, vitamins and minerals. Clare Mulroy, USA TODAY, 14 Apr. 2024 Physical sunscreens, meanwhile, use minerals like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide to shield skin from UV rays. Deanna Pai, Vogue, 3 Apr. 2024 Each ingredient in the supplement is packed with minerals, vitamins, and anti-oxidant properties. Michael Carroll, Discover Magazine, 3 Apr. 2024 In fact, no mineral resources let alone mineral reserves demonstrating economic viability and technical feasibility, have been delineated on the Aukam property. Miami Herald, 3 Apr. 2024 Although Brazil has a complex web of laws to protect the wilderness, settler communities inevitably find ways to profit from the minerals and the timber found in the rain forest, and Boa Vista is booming. Jon Lee Anderson, The New Yorker, 1 Apr. 2024 As Curiosity moves across Gediz Vallis, this region of Mars is enriched with sulfates, or salty minerals that often form as water evaporates. Passant Rabie / Gizmodo, Quartz, 1 Apr. 2024 As other nations move in to capitalize on deep sea minerals, namely China, there’s a push to make U.S. involvement more formal. Sarah Whitmire, Forbes, 28 Mar. 2024 Certain parts of a world that has 10 biomes have their own minerals and other resources. Gieson Cacho, The Mercury News, 26 Mar. 2024
Adjective
There’s also our planet, which bears the brunt of mineral extraction and pollution. Cosmas Luckyson Zavazava, Fortune, 8 Apr. 2024 Would the battle for the mineral rights of the fictional Pandora resonate with audiences? EW.com, 4 Apr. 2024 Not only is the lightweight skin tint packed with mineral SPF and potent skincare ingredients, but it’s clinically proven to improve dryness, blemishes, redness, and wrinkles over time. Averi Baudler, Peoplemag, 5 Mar. 2024 This beautiful pair is made from mineral glass (which is reportedly 12 times more scratch-resistant than traditional lenses) and features color-enhancing tech that makes even the most mundane seem vibrant. Kristy Alpert, Travel + Leisure, 23 Feb. 2024 Biochar contains mineral ash, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and fixed carbon that can be used as a soil additive that increases water retention. Ashley Miznazi, Miami Herald, 3 Jan. 2024 Don’t expect exotic fruit flavors here, beyond a lovely hint of pear and apricot; the main impression is mineral — as if the wine were bearing a message from the Earth itself. Dave McIntyre, Washington Post, 18 Jan. 2024 Circular economy interventions like increasing metal recovery and reusing mineral and non-mineral waste may also support emission reductions across the mining value chains. Carla Delgado, Popular Science, 28 June 2023 The moody aroma is reminiscent of cliffside vegetation, transporting the wearer to the stormy seashore through mineral top notes and metallic base accords. India Espy-Jones, Essence, 2 Jan. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'mineral.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English, from Medieval Latin minerale, from neuter of mineralis

Adjective

Middle English, from Medieval Latin mineralis, from minera mine, ore, from Old French minere, miniere, from mine

First Known Use

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of mineral was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near mineral

Cite this Entry

“Mineral.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mineral. Accessed 23 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

mineral

1 of 2 noun
min·​er·​al ˈmin-(ə-)rəl How to pronounce mineral (audio)
1
: a solid chemical element or compound (as diamond or quartz) that occurs naturally in the form of crystals and results from inorganic processes
2
: a naturally occurring substance (as ore, petroleum, or water) obtained usually from the ground

mineral

2 of 2 adjective
1
: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a mineral : inorganic
2
: containing mineral salts or gases
mineral water

Medical Definition

mineral

1 of 2 noun
min·​er·​al ˈmin(-ə)-rəl How to pronounce mineral (audio)
: a solid homogeneous crystalline chemical element or compound that results from the inorganic processes of nature

mineral

2 of 2 adjective
1
: of or relating to minerals
also : inorganic
2
: impregnated with mineral substances

More from Merriam-Webster on mineral

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