migrate

verb
mi·​grate | \ ˈmī-ˌgrāt How to pronounce migrate (audio) , mī-ˈgrāt How to pronounce migrate (audio) \
migrated; migrating

Definition of migrate

intransitive verb

1 : to move from one country, place, or locality to another Thousands of workers migrate to this area in the summer.
2 : to pass usually periodically from one region or climate to another for feeding or breeding The whales migrate between their feeding ground in the north and their breeding ground in the Caribbean.
3 : to change position or location in an organism or substance filarial worms migrate within the human body

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Other Words from migrate

migrator \ ˈmī-​ˌgrā-​tər How to pronounce migrator (audio) , mī-​ˈgrā-​ \ noun

Examples of migrate in a Sentence

He migrates from New York to Florida each winter. Thousands of workers migrate to this area each summer. The whales migrate between their feeding ground in the north and their breeding ground in the Caribbean. They followed the migrating herds of buffalo across the plains.
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Recent Examples on the Web Greater Cincinnati should miss out on the dust plume for now but the National Weather Service in Wilmington said the plume could potentially migrate closer to the Ohio Valley by the end of June. Sarah Brookbank, The Enquirer, "The Saharan dust plume is coming. When will it reach Cincinnati?," 24 June 2020 As the pests begin to migrate again in the second half of June, experts warn that, without continuous aid to mitigate the spread, the devastation could leave millions of people in at least 23 countries hungry by the end of the year. NBC News, "Trump 'furious' about low Tulsa turnout, a 'heinous' NASCAR discovery, and Dems to probe SDNY drama," 21 June 2020 The herbivorous dinosaurs weigh hundreds of tons and migrate in earth-flattening herds; the carnosaurs that prey on them are outsize to match. Tom Shippey, WSJ, "Science Fiction: Dinosaurs, Teens and Office Politics," 19 June 2020 Older kids, meanwhile, will watch their graduations and proms and other coming-of-age rituals migrate online. Chris Colin, Wired, "News at 11: Kid Reporters Tackle the Coronavirus," 18 June 2020 The gold panners who migrate to Hunza seasonally, living in tents along the river, celebrate the warmer weather—even the floods. Brendan Hoffman, National Geographic, "A water crisis looms for 270 million people as South Asia’s glaciers shrink," 16 June 2020 The writer of the song, Harlem resident and renowned musician Josiah Ford, later took up on the offer to migrate to Ethiopia. Zecharias Zelalem, Quartz Africa, "The intertwined histories of the African American freedom struggle and Ethiopia’s war against fascism," 14 June 2020 There is evidence that the virus can migrate into the central nervous system via the nose and olfactory bulbs as well as by other routes without invading the sensory neurons. Leslie Kay, Scientific American, "Why COVID-19 Makes People Lose Their Sense of Smell," 13 June 2020 About a month into their development, the fry undergo a metamorphosis: Their skull shape begins to change, and one eye begins to migrate over the fish’s head to join the other. National Geographic, "Flatfishes," 11 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'migrate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of migrate

circa 1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for migrate

Latin migratus, past participle of migrare; perhaps akin to Greek ameibein to change

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Time Traveler for migrate

Time Traveler

The first known use of migrate was circa 1623

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Statistics for migrate

Last Updated

30 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Migrate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/migrate. Accessed 9 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for migrate

migrate

verb
How to pronounce migrate (audio) How to pronounce migrate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of migrate

: to move from one country or place to live or work in another
of a bird or animal : to move from one area to another at different times of the year

migrate

verb
mi·​grate | \ ˈmī-ˌgrāt How to pronounce migrate (audio) \
migrated; migrating

Kids Definition of migrate

1 : to move from one country or region to another Families migrated west in search of work.
2 : to pass from one region to another on a regular basis Many birds migrate south for the winter.
mi·​grate | \ ˈmī-ˌgrāt How to pronounce migrate (audio) , mī-ˈ How to pronounce migrate (audio) \
migrated; migrating

Medical Definition of migrate

: to move from one place to another: as
a : to move from one site to another in a host organism especially as part of a life cycle filarial worms migrate within the human body
b of an atom or group : to shift position within a molecule

Other Words from migrate

migratory \ ˈmī-​grə-​ˌtōr-​ē, -​ˌtȯr-​ How to pronounce migratory (audio) \ adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on migrate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for migrate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with migrate

Spanish Central: Translation of migrate

Nglish: Translation of migrate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of migrate for Arabic Speakers

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