metropolitan

1 of 2

noun

met·​ro·​pol·​i·​tan ˌme-trə-ˈpä-lə-tən How to pronounce metropolitan (audio)
1
: the primate of an ecclesiastical province
2
: one who lives in a metropolis or displays metropolitan manners or customs

metropolitan

2 of 2

adjective

1
: of or constituting a metropolitan or his see
2
: of, relating to, or characteristic of a metropolis and sometimes including its suburbs
3
: of, relating to, or constituting a mother country as distinguished from a colony

Examples of metropolitan in a Sentence

Noun a TV series about the lives and loves of a group of young, attractive metropolitans Adjective the greater New York metropolitan area This is one of the best seafood restaurants in metropolitan Los Angeles.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Unfortunately, in the many car-centric metropolitans of the US, a leisurely stroll from your hotel lobby might just lead you to a parking lot instead. Hannah Towey, Condé Nast Traveler, 18 Jan. 2024 In September, median asking rents in the 50 largest metropolitans dropped to $1,747, according to Realtor.com’s latest rental report released on Monday. Byalena Botros, Fortune, 23 Oct. 2023 RentCafe’s report was based on Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, or IPUMS, data from the University of Minnesota looking at the nation’s 110 largest metropolitans. Bailey Schulz, USA TODAY, 7 Apr. 2023 The city was the last metropolitan in Alabama to rid itself of the commission form of government. John Sharp, al, 18 Jan. 2022 Thailand declared semi-lockdowns in the Bangkok metropolitan and 6 other province on July 12. Fernando Alfonso Iii, CNN, 17 July 2021 But truly rural areas are a relatively small slice of the electorate: In 2016, only 14 percent of all voters cast ballots in counties defined by the Census Bureau as non-metropolitan. David Wasserman, NBC News, 28 Oct. 2019 Brexit devolved into an identity war: an English counter-revolution between nationalists and internationalists, country geezers versus young metropolitans, Little England versus Great Britain. Tina Brown, Time, 6 June 2019 The new list ranks the country's 125 largest metropolitan areas based on affordability, job prospects and quality of life. Enquirer Staff, Cincinnati.com, 13 Apr. 2018
Adjective
More than 53,000 people have fled the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area between March 8 and March 27, according to a report from the U.N.’s International Organization for Migration (IOM). Ashley Carnahan, Fox News, 6 Apr. 2024 Residents across the Northeast were rattled by a 4.8 magnitude earthquake that shook the densely populated New York City metropolitan area and much of the surrounding region on Friday morning. Lucia Suarez Sang, CBS News, 5 Apr. 2024 An earthquake shook the densely populated New York City metropolitan area the morning of April 5, the U.S. Geological Survey said, with residents across the Northeast reporting rumbling in a region where people are unaccustomed to feeling the ground move. Jennifer Peltz, The Christian Science Monitor, 5 Apr. 2024 An earthquake shook the densely populated New York City metropolitan area Friday morning, the U.S. Geological Survey said, with residents across the Northeast reporting rumbling in a region where people are unaccustomed to feeling the ground move. Jennifer Peltz, Fortune, 5 Apr. 2024 Grovetown is part of the Augusta metropolitan area in east Georgia. Olivia Lloyd, Miami Herald, 5 Apr. 2024 Last March, the Bay Area became the first U.S. metropolitan area where half of all new vehicle registrations were for EVs and hybrids, according to S&P Global Mobility. Ethan Baron, The Mercury News, 4 Apr. 2024 New York City’s metropolitan area, including parts of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, has the most million-dollar cities with 106 — 24 more than a year ago. Rocio Fabbro, Quartz, 3 Apr. 2024 Trump won the Republican vote in the rural north and west but was thrashed in metropolitan Milwaukee and Madison. Craig Gilbert, Journal Sentinel, 2 Apr. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'metropolitan.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adjective

Middle English, from Late Latin metropolitanus of the see of a metropolitan, from metropolita, noun, metropolitan, from Late Greek mētropolitēs, from mētropolis see of a metropolitan, from Greek, capital

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of metropolitan was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near metropolitan

Cite this Entry

“Metropolitan.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/metropolitan. Accessed 12 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

metropolitan

1 of 2 noun
met·​ro·​pol·​i·​tan ˌme-trə-ˈpäl-ət-ᵊn How to pronounce metropolitan (audio)
1
: the head of a church province
2
: one who lives in a metropolis or who has metropolitan manners or customs

metropolitan

2 of 2 adjective
1
: of, relating to, or characteristic of a metropolis
2
: of or relating to a city and the densely populated surrounding areas

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