marquess

noun
mar·quess | \ ˈmär-kwəs \
variants: or \ˈmär-kwəs, mär-ˈkē \
plural marquesses or marquises\-kwə-səz \ or marquis\-ˈkē(z) \

Definition of marquess 

1 : a nobleman of hereditary rank in Europe and Japan

2 : a member of the British peerage ranking below a duke and above an earl

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Other words from marquess

marquessate \ˈmär-kwə-sət \ or marquisate \ˈmär-kwə-zət, -sət \ noun

Examples of marquess in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

The British hereditary title is directly below baron, with viscounts, earls, marquesses, and dukes above it. Sam Dangremond, Town & Country, "6 Things to Know About Jack Brooksbank's Family Ahead of His Wedding to Princess Eugenie," 26 June 2018 Baronet is a rank in the British aristocracy, albeit below dukes, marquesses, earls, viscounts, and barons. Caroline Picard, Good Housekeeping, "Everything We Know About Jack Brooksbank's Family Ahead of the Royal Wedding," 12 June 2018 And if none of that is successful, McGregor could bend the Marquess of Queensberry rules to their breaking point in hopes of goading Mayweather into a brawl. Greg Beacham, The Seattle Times, "McGregor must get rough and creative to upset Mayweather," 24 Aug. 2017 Marquess has won 629 conference games, 154 games against Cal, 131 postseason games and 36 College World Series games, which includes two national championships (1987 and ’88). Daniel Mano, The Mercury News, "Stanford baseball coach becomes fourth in Division I history with 1,600 wins," 4 Apr. 2017 Marquess registered his 1,600th victory as a college coach — something only two others have done with the same program — with the No. Daniel Mano, The Mercury News, "Stanford baseball coach becomes fourth in Division I history with 1,600 wins," 4 Apr. 2017 As each coach from the other five Bay Area schools — Cal, San Jose State, Santa Clara, Saint Mary’s, USF — got in front of the microphone, a story about Marquess followed almost immediately. Martin Gallegos, The Mercury News, "Stanford baseball coach Mark Marquess hopes to go out in style," 17 Feb. 2017 Baden-Powell, the father of the Boy Scouts, and the marquess, the namesake of boxing’s Queensberry Rules, were both advocates of those quintessential British ideals, fair play and decorum. Howard Schneider, WSJ, "The Guerrillas of London," 3 Feb. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'marquess.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of marquess

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for marquess

Middle English marquis, markis, from Anglo-French marquys, markys, from marche march

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Time Traveler for marquess

The first known use of marquess was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for marquess

marquess

noun

English Language Learners Definition of marquess

: a British nobleman who has a rank that is below a duke and above an earl

marquess

noun
mar·quess | \ ˈmär-kwəs \

Kids Definition of marquess

: a British nobleman ranking below a duke and above an earl

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More from Merriam-Webster on marquess

Spanish Central: Translation of marquess

Nglish: Translation of marquess for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about marquess

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