liquefaction

noun
liq·​ue·​fac·​tion | \ ˌli-kwə-ˈfak-shən How to pronounce liquefaction (audio) \

Definition of liquefaction

1 : the process of making or becoming liquid
2 : the state of being liquid
3 : conversion of soil into a fluidlike mass during an earthquake or other seismic event

Examples of liquefaction in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web There’s also the potential for methane to escape at the liquefaction facilities themselves. New York Times, 6 July 2022 Ships and tankers loaded with coal and oil can be redirected, while the ability to resell natural gas is constrained by liquefaction terminals, which are sparse in Russia and take years to build. Steve Cicala, Forbes, 26 May 2022 Last Wednesday, Israel agreed to pipe billions of dollars’ worth of natural gas to Europe via Egyptian liquefaction facilities, as Russia halts supplies and the continent scrambles to refill dwindling stockpiles. Shira Rubin, Washington Post, 20 June 2022 The first of four natural gas liquefaction units on site started up for the first time in 2019, while two others started up in early 2020. Jay R. Jordan, Chron, 8 June 2022 Modular natural gas liquefaction units are built in a shipyard and installed on repurposed offshore oil platforms. Christopher Helman, Forbes, 27 May 2022 Now, though, European Union sanctions that prohibit the sale of gas liquefaction equipment to Russia have thrown the giant complex into doubt. New York Times, 18 May 2022 New pipelines and gas liquefaction facilities take years to build. Ivana Kottasová And Charles Riley, CNN, 8 Feb. 2022 About liquefaction: Sandy soils are held together by friction. Bruce Barcott, Outside Online, 25 Aug. 2011 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'liquefaction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of liquefaction

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for liquefaction

Middle English, from Late Latin liquefaction-, liquefactio, from Latin liquefacere, from liquēre to be fluid + facere to make — more at do

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Time Traveler for liquefaction

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The first known use of liquefaction was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near liquefaction

liquate

liquefaction

liquefactive

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Statistics for liquefaction

Last Updated

23 Jul 2022

Cite this Entry

“Liquefaction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/liquefaction. Accessed 19 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for liquefaction

liquefaction

noun
liq·​ue·​fac·​tion | \ ˌlik-wə-ˈfak-shən How to pronounce liquefaction (audio) \

Medical Definition of liquefaction

1 : the process of making or becoming liquid
2 : the state of being liquid

More from Merriam-Webster on liquefaction

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about liquefaction

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