lector

noun
lec·​tor | \ ˈlek-tər How to pronounce lector (audio) , -ˌtȯr \

Definition of lector

: a person who assists at a worship service chiefly by reading the lection

Examples of lector in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Subjected to harassment, lesser wages and unwanted advances in a shadowy cigar factory, she becomes enraptured by books read aloud to the workers by a lector who quickly falls in love with her. Washington Post, 30 Mar. 2021 Delgado also is a parishioner, serving as a lector and extraordinary minister of the Holy Eucharist. Mort Mazor, sun-sentinel.com, 24 Dec. 2020 And a priest whom Brignac knew soon extended an invitation to serve as a Mass lector at St. Mary Magdalen. David A. Hammer, NOLA.com, 16 Dec. 2020 To Gesu Catholic Church in northwest Detroit, lector Clida Ellison brought a voice that was gentle yet commanding in its rendition of the Word. Patricia Montemurri, Detroit Free Press, 10 May 2020 There, safely socially distanced, he is joined by a technician, a lector, a pianist and Celine Kennelly, executive director of the Office of Civic Engagement & Immigrant Affairs and beloved in San Francisco’s Irish community for her heavenly voice. Catherine Bigelow, SFChronicle.com, 7 Apr. 2020 Tom was a devout member of St. John Catholic Church in Old Saybrook and ministered there as a lector for many years. courant.com, 18 Oct. 2019 Carol said her husband, who was a lector at St. Jerome for nearly 50 years, trained her to be a forensics and debate judge. Evan Frank, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 29 Oct. 2019 In the play, a lector, well dressed and well mannered, reads to workers rolling cigars in nineteenth-century Tampa. Hilton Als, The New Yorker, 4 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lector.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lector

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for lector

Middle English, from Late Latin, reader of the lessons in a church service, from Latin, reader, from legere

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The first known use of lector was in the 14th century

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Cite this Entry

“Lector.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lector. Accessed 23 Jun. 2021.

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