lector

noun
lec·​tor | \ ˈlek-tər How to pronounce lector (audio) , -ˌtȯr \

Definition of lector

: a person who assists at a worship service chiefly by reading the lection

Examples of lector in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web To Gesu Catholic Church in northwest Detroit, lector Clida Ellison brought a voice that was gentle yet commanding in its rendition of the Word. Patricia Montemurri, Detroit Free Press, "Clida Ellison, fixture at Gesu, mother of lawyers, doctor and a ground-breaking politician," 10 May 2020 There, safely socially distanced, he is joined by a technician, a lector, a pianist and Celine Kennelly, executive director of the Office of Civic Engagement & Immigrant Affairs and beloved in San Francisco’s Irish community for her heavenly voice. Catherine Bigelow, SFChronicle.com, "In San Francisco, Easter Mass will count its blessings via YouTube and streaming," 7 Apr. 2020 Tom was a devout member of St. John Catholic Church in Old Saybrook and ministered there as a lector for many years. courant.com, "Thomas Gregory Mathers," 18 Oct. 2019 Carol said her husband, who was a lector at St. Jerome for nearly 50 years, trained her to be a forensics and debate judge. Evan Frank, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "An Oconomowoc teacher who created the first video yearbook in Wisconsin remembered for his innovation has died," 29 Oct. 2019 In the play, a lector, well dressed and well mannered, reads to workers rolling cigars in nineteenth-century Tampa. Hilton Als, The New Yorker, "Nilo Cruz’s “Exquisita Agonía” and What We Lose Through Dispossession," 4 June 2017 Koreans will often make the dish both to eat and spread around the house to keep evil spirits away, according to Seungja Choi, a senior lector of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University. Time, "4 Winter Solstice Rituals From Around the World," 13 Dec. 2017 But McCaskey, who lives in Lake Forest and works as a lector and parish board member at Church of St. Mary, also has found time to write five books. Samantha Nelson, chicagotribune.com, "Bears co-owner Patrick McCaskey to talk 'Pilgrimage' book in Lake Forest," 7 June 2017 Judge O'Neill had been a communicant, lector and cantor at St. Mark Roman Catholic Church in Fallston, and in 1983 had been ordained a deacon by Archbishop William D. Borders. Frederick N. Rasmussen, baltimoresun.com, "Harry St. A. O'Neill, retired District Court judge, dies," 5 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lector.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lector

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for lector

Middle English, from Late Latin, reader of the lessons in a church service, from Latin, reader, from legere

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Time Traveler for lector

Time Traveler

The first known use of lector was in the 14th century

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Statistics for lector

Last Updated

22 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Lector.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lector. Accessed 9 Jul. 2020.

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More from Merriam-Webster on lector

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for lector

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with lector

Spanish Central: Translation of lector

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about lector

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