launder

verb
laun·​der | \ ˈlȯn-dər, ˈlän-\
laundered; laundering\ ˈlȯn-​d(ə-​)riŋ , ˈlän-​ \

Definition of launder

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wash (something, such as clothing) in water
2 : to make ready for use by washing and ironing a freshly laundered shirt
3 : to transfer (illegally obtained money or investments) through an outside party to conceal the true source
4 : sanitize sense 2 laundered language

intransitive verb

: to wash or wash and iron clothing or household linens

launder

noun

Definition of launder (Entry 2 of 2)

: trough especially : a box conduit conveying particulate material suspended in water in ore dressing

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Other Words from launder

Verb

launderer \ ˈlȯn-​dər-​ər , ˈlän-​ \ noun

Examples of launder in a Sentence

Verb

He used a phony business to launder money from drug dealing. had to launder the quarterback's off-the-cuff's remarks before they could be quoted in the newspaper

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Federal prosecutors in Manhattan have charged Singapore businessman Tan Wee Beng with helping North Korea launder millions of dollars. Niharika Mandhana And Aruna Viswanatha, WSJ, "North Korea Built an Alternative Financial System Using a Shadowy Network of Traders," 28 Dec. 2018 That foreign involvement could very easily be laundered through an American starting an LLC. Casey Newton, The Verge, "A new kind of dark money on Facebook is influencing elections," 18 Oct. 2018 The bureau’s chairman drew ridicule during Mr Sharif’s trial by launching an investigation into whether the ex-PM had laundered almost $5bn through India as prime minister. The Economist, "Pakistan’s former prime minister embraces jail to rally his party," 12 July 2018 Jesús Fernández de Luna, a drug trafficker connected to the Zetas drug cartel and who prosecutors allege helped the gang launder money in the U.S., was sentenced to nearly 16 years in prison Thursday. Jason Buch, San Antonio Express-News, "16 years in prison for Zetas leader’s in-law," 18 Jan. 2018 If the stain remains, treat with a prewash stain remover, like Shout Advanced Gel ($14 for a 3-pack, amazon.com), and launder again. Lauren Smith, Good Housekeeping, "How to Get Paint Out of Clothes and More," 2 Jan. 2018 The skyscraper apartments and banks of Dubai also serve as a crucial financial safe haven for the average Iranian, as well as for government and paramilitary officials to launder money. Jon Gambrell, Fox News, "AP Analysis: Yemen rebel threats to Dubai show danger looms," 31 Aug. 2018 Mueller’s office has already charged Manafort with conspiracy against the United States, conspiracy to launder money, unregistered agent of a foreign principal, false and misleading FARA statements, and false statements. Alana Abramson, Time, "Robert Mueller Indicts Konstantin Kilimnik and Hits Paul Manafort With Another Charge," 8 June 2018 Their cases stand in stark contrast to those of Mr. Charles, whose plight has gained national prominence, or John Knock, who in 2000 was given two life sentences plus 20 years without parole for conspiracy to launder money and distribute marijuana. Katie Benner, New York Times, "Pardon System Needs Fixing, Advocates Say, but They Cringe at Trump’s Approach," 1 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Sure enough, NAPS is now a means by which Navy launders underqualified athletes into the Naval Academy. Joe Nocera, New York Times, "Navy Opens a Back Door, and In Come Athletes and Victories," 9 Dec. 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'launder.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of launder

Verb

1664, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1667, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for launder

Verb

Middle English launder, noun

Noun

Middle English, launderer, from Anglo-French lavandere, from Medieval Latin lavandarius, from Latin lavandus, gerundive of lavare to wash — more at lye

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Statistics for launder

Last Updated

18 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for launder

The first known use of launder was in 1664

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More Definitions for launder

launder

verb

English Language Learners Definition of launder

: to make (clothes, towels, sheets, etc.) ready for use by washing, drying, and ironing them

: to put (money that you got by doing something illegal) into a business or bank account in order to hide where it really came from

launder

verb
laun·​der | \ ˈlȯn-dər \
laundered; laundering

Kids Definition of launder

: to wash or wash and iron clothes or household linens

Other Words from launder

launderer noun

launder

transitive verb
laun·​der

Legal Definition of launder

: to transfer (money or instruments deriving from illegal activity) so as to conceal the true nature and source launder money through an offshore account

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More from Merriam-Webster on launder

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with launder

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for launder

Spanish Central: Translation of launder

Nglish: Translation of launder for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of launder for Arabic Speakers

Comments on launder

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