lacerate

verb
lac·​er·​ate | \ ˈla-sə-ˌrāt How to pronounce lacerate (audio) \
lacerated; lacerating

Definition of lacerate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to tear or rend roughly : wound jaggedly
2 : to cause sharp mental or emotional pain to : distress

lacerate

adjective
lac·​er·​ate | \ ˈla-sə-rət How to pronounce lacerate (audio) , -ˌrāt \
variants: or lacerated \ ˈla-​sə-​ˌrā-​təd How to pronounce lacerated (audio) \

Definition of lacerate (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : torn jaggedly : mangled
b : extremely harrowed or distracted
2 : having the edges deeply and irregularly cut a lacerate petal

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Other Words from lacerate

Verb

lacerative \ ˈla-​sə-​ˌrā-​tiv How to pronounce lacerative (audio) \ adjective

Examples of lacerate in a Sentence

Verb The broken glass lacerated his feet. The patient's hand was severely lacerated.
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Doctors gave her blood transfusions and tried to repair her lacerated liver. Melody Petersen, Los Angeles Times, "Key cases where death probes were complicated by harvesting of body parts," 13 Oct. 2019 Except for one thing: Much of his stump speech lacerates Silicon Valley. Wired, "Andrew Yang Is Not Full of Shit," 5 Nov. 2019 September features a lacerating account of Donald Trump’s clumsy efforts to become a Hollywood macher. Peter Haldeman, Los Angeles Times, "He may hate the word ‘buzz,’ but Los Angeles magazine editor Maer Roshan is creating it," 5 Sep. 2019 Her liver had been lacerated by blunt force trauma. Robert Gearty, Fox News, "Oregon man arrested in 1978 cold case murder of Alaska teen, authorities say," 7 Sep. 2019 One room is full of dress forms wearing fur coats whose backsides are splattered and lacerated with paint. Sharon Mizota, latimes.com, "If an artist sets up a homeless camp inside a blue-chip art gallery, does anyone care?," 18 June 2019 The attacks had fractured his left leg and lacerated his scalp. Joanna Slater, Washington Post, "At church, on Easter, the Sri Lanka attackers destroyed families. Now survivors must learn to live alone.," 2 July 2019 The Agatha Christie-like ecosystem pairs with lacerating contemporary wit, and alternating past and present scenes makes for a multilayered, modern detective story. Jen Doll, New York Times, "Secrets, Lies and a Murder (or Three) in the Latest Y.A. Crossover Novels," 9 Mar. 2018 The previous night, Castro, a former housing secretary and San Antonio mayor, lacerated the former three-term congressman from El Paso for refusing his call to decriminalize border crossing of any sort. Todd J. Gillman, Dallas News, "At Florida detention site for migrant teens, Beto O’Rourke slams Trump, parries Julian Castro’s jabs," 27 June 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Reared in New York's indelicate political culture, Trump does not like to appear meek, using rallies and his Twitter account to lacerate rivals. Paul Schwartzman And Josh Dawsey, chicagotribune.com, "'It's burning people out': Trump aides endure public fury toward president's policies around D.C.," 9 July 2018 Reared in New York’s indelicate political culture, Trump does not like to appear meek, using rallies and his Twitter account to lacerate rivals. Paul Schwartzman, Washington Post, "‘Viciousness’: Trump aides endure public fury toward president’s policies," 9 July 2018 Reared in New York's indelicate political culture, Trump does not like to appear meek, using rallies and his Twitter account to lacerate rivals. Author: Paul Schwartzman, Josh Dawsey, Anchorage Daily News, "'Viciousness': Trump aides endure public fury toward president's policies," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lacerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lacerate

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1514, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for lacerate

Verb

Middle English, from Latin laceratus, past participle of lacerare to tear; akin to Greek lakis tear

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Time Traveler for lacerate

Time Traveler

The first known use of lacerate was in the 15th century

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Statistics for lacerate

Last Updated

3 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Lacerate.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lacerating. Accessed 7 December 2019.

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More Definitions for lacerate

lacerate

verb
How to pronounce lacerate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of lacerate

: to cut or tear (someone's flesh) deeply or roughly

lacerate

verb
lac·​er·​ate | \ ˈla-sə-ˌrāt How to pronounce lacerate (audio) \
lacerated; lacerating

Kids Definition of lacerate

: to injure by cutting or tearing deeply or roughly a lacerated knee
lac·​er·​ate | \ ˈlas-ə-ˌrāt How to pronounce lacerate (audio) \
lacerated; lacerating

Medical Definition of lacerate

: to tear or rend roughly : wound jaggedly a lacerated spleen

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Comments on lacerate

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