juice

1 of 2

noun

1
: the extractable fluid contents of cells or tissues
2
: a motivating, inspiring, or enabling force or factor
creative juices
3
: a medium (such as electricity or gasoline) that supplies power
4
a
juices plural : the natural fluids of an animal body
b
: the liquid or moisture contained in something
5
a
: the inherent quality of a thing : essence
b
: strength, vigor, vitality
pioneers … full of juice and jestsSinclair Lewis
6
slang : liquor
7
slang : exorbitant interest exacted of a borrower under the threat of violence
8
slang : influence, clout
juiceless adjective

juice

2 of 2

verb

juiced; juicing

transitive verb

1
: to extract the juice of
2
: to add juice to

Example Sentences

Noun a glass of apple juice a variety of fruit juices the juice of a steak gravy made with real beef juices His camera ran out of juice because he forgot to replace the battery.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Most of Florida’s oranges are processed into juice. Jim Turner, Orlando Sentinel, 13 Jan. 2023 Step 2Meanwhile, squeeze juice of 1/2 lime into medium bowl (about 4 teaspoons), stir in a pinch of salt to dissolve, then stir in onion; let sit 5 minutes. Joy Cho, Good Housekeeping, 13 Jan. 2023 The Aztecs take it seriously enough that most players drink beetroot juice brewed up by athletic trainer Sergio Ibarra in the days before, convinced of its abilities to better deliver oxygen to muscles because of its high nitrate content. San Diego Union-Tribune, 6 Jan. 2023 Apple is presumably hoping some Ted Lasso juice can rub off on this new series while waiting for that show's delayed third season, as Shrinking is produced by Ted Lasso executive producer Bill Lawrence and star Brett Goldstein, who plays Roy Kent. Brendan Morrow, The Week, 4 Jan. 2023 Squeeze juice from other orange half into a medium bowl; whisk in honey, soy sauce, vinegar, ginger and remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil. People Staff, Peoplemag, 2 Jan. 2023 The Yankees are most likely hoping there’s still some juice left in the bat, and a non-roster deal is a low-risk move for last year’s AL East champions. Dallas News, 1 Jan. 2023 Clear liquids – like water – are best but experts also recommend warm apple juice or lemonade for small children. Adrianna Rodriguez, USA TODAY, 27 Dec. 2022 Finally, testers spilled apple juice on the mattress pads to evaluate their water and stain resistance. Molly Blanco, Better Homes & Gardens, 22 Dec. 2022
Verb
As Jacob put it in June, the company needs to juice revenue after its slowest quarter of revenue growth in 21 years. Bykylie Robison, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2022 This month, the Utah Homelessness Council voted unanimously to juice the project with $4 million of public money. Blake Apgar, The Salt Lake Tribune, 22 Sep. 2022 This was the latest evidence of who Fields has become, one of the most electric playmakers in football with the ability to juice an entire team and an entire stadium with one play. Dan Wiederer, Chicago Tribune, 20 Dec. 2022 Tens of thousands of American aspiring writers were publishing and tweeting in no small part to juice the interest of a tiny set of elite opinion makers. WIRED, 2 Dec. 2022 Like corporate chief executives forever chasing quarterly earnings to juice a firm’s stock price, these big donors are generally disinclined to support infrastructure-building efforts whose success can’t be measured in the short term. Jonathan Mahler, New York Times, 1 Nov. 2022 Some of the brokers also try to juice profits by hoarding and price gouging, behavior that violates Chinese regulations and that local authorities have sought to crack down on. Bybloomberg, Fortune, 19 Oct. 2022 Unlike Denis, however, Rollin is never afraid to indulge in camp, and occasionally outright sleaze, to juice his narrative at just the right moments. Declan Gallagher, EW.com, 27 Aug. 2022 Boosting productivity growth can also juice the economy. Paul Davidson, USA TODAY, 2 Nov. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'juice.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English jus, from Anglo-French, broth, juice, from Latin; akin to Old Norse ostr cheese, Greek zymē leaven, Sanskrit yūṣa broth

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1603, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Time Traveler
The first known use of juice was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near juice

Cite this Entry

“Juice.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/juice. Accessed 8 Feb. 2023.

Kids Definition

juice

noun
ˈjüs
1
a
: the liquid part that can be squeezed out of vegetables and fruits
orange juice
b
: the fluid part of meat
2
a
: the natural fluids (as blood, lymph, and secretions) of an animal body
b
: the liquid or moisture contained in something
3
: something (as electricity or gasoline) that supplies power
juiced
ˈjüst
adjective

Medical Definition

juice

noun
1
: the extractable fluid contents of cells or tissues
2
a
: a natural bodily fluid (as blood, lymph, or a secretion) see gastric juice, intestinal juice, pancreatic juice
b
: the liquid or moisture contained in something

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