juggle

verb
jug·​gle | \ ˈjə-gəl How to pronounce juggle (audio) \
juggled; juggling\ ˈjə-​g(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce juggling (audio) \

Definition of juggle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to perform the tricks of a juggler
2 : to engage in manipulation especially in order to achieve a desired end

transitive verb

1 : to handle or deal with usually several things (such as obligations) at one time so as to satisfy often competing requirements juggle the responsibilities of family life and full-time job— Jane S. Gould
2a : to practice deceit or trickery on : beguile
b : to manipulate or rearrange especially in order to achieve a desired end juggle an account to hide a loss
3a : to toss in the manner of a juggler
b : to hold or balance precariously

juggle

noun

Definition of juggle (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of juggling:
a : a trick of magic
b : a show of manual dexterity
c : an act of manipulation especially to achieve a desired end

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Examples of juggle in a Sentence

Verb He is learning to juggle. He juggled four balls at once. She somehow manages to juggle a dozen tasks at once. It can be hard to juggle family responsibilities and the demands of a full-time job. I'll have to juggle my schedule a bit to get this all to work out. Noun a temporary suspension of the gas tax was just a crowd-pleasing juggle that was not a long-term solution to the energy problem
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb As smart as Johnson is with juggling screen time, the film leaves us wanting more of her. John Wenzel, The Know, "Review: “Knives Out” is a dazzling, witty murder mystery in an age of franchises," 28 Nov. 2019 Across the hall, graphic designer Ann Volpe told of juggling clients’ tight deadlines and budgets, while freelance photographer Victoria Pietri lamented how poor weather can wreck a potentially lucractive photo shoot. Don Stacom, courant.com, "At Career Day, Plainville students ponder work as chefs, nurses, sports commentators or landscapers," 22 Nov. 2019 Victoria Beckham opened up about juggling her family life and her business in a new interview with Vogue Poland. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Victoria Beckham on Being a "Good Mother" While Running Her Business," 12 Nov. 2019 His vision of SoftBank involves one man being largely responsible for hundreds of billions of dollars—and for juggling no small number of competing objectives and interest groups. The Economist, "Hard times for SoftBank," 7 Nov. 2019 Isabella finished with 139 yards on six receptions and credited his successful bobbling act on juggling tennis balls. Matt Goul, cleveland, "No. 9 Mayfield tops No. 10 Kenston, 24-21, for WRC crown and first undefeated regular season in 35 years," 2 Nov. 2019 Zacarías shows an impressively light touch in juggling the play’s dueling plot imperatives as well as its analogies to issues of immigration and ethnic identity and white entitlement. BostonGlobe.com, "It’s relatively unusual for two plays by a writer not named Shakespeare to be simultaneously running at two different Boston-area theaters. But after seeing “The Book Club Play’’ and “Native Gardens,’’ a pair of snappy, crowd-pleasing comedies by Karen Zacarías, I get it.," 9 Oct. 2019 The running back scared nearly all of the 69,000 in attendance by juggling the pass before gaining control. Tim Booth, orlandosentinel.com, "Russell Wilson throws 4 TD passes as Seahawks hold off Rams 30-29," 4 Oct. 2019 The running back scared nearly all of the 69,000 in attendance by juggling the pass before gaining control. Tim Booth, baltimoresun.com, "Russell Wilson throws 4 TD passes, Seahawks hold off Rams, 30-29," 4 Oct. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun This busy-yet-pleasant juggle of abilities is what the Luigi's Mansion series has been missing for years. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "Luigi’s Mansion 3 review: The most “Nintendo” game from Nintendo in years," 28 Oct. 2019 Many who have lost a thyroid due to cancer or other diseases, know the juggle of ensuring the proper dose of thyroid medication and regulation is present in their body. chicagotribune.com, "Thyroid-related headaches and CBD: a new solution to an old problem," 11 Sep. 2019 Figuring out how much meat to order and cook is a constant juggle of supply and demand meatonomics. San Antonio Express-News, "52 Weeks of BBQ: Naming the best of the best San Antonio barbecue," 30 Aug. 2019 Join in these workshops on twerking, yoga, hoops, juggles, rope dart and more with top instructors from around the world. Lisa Herendeen, The Mercury News, "10 awesome Burning Man things to do on Day 4, Aug. 28," 5 Aug. 2019 And Holland continues to earn his Spidey stripes with his delicate, teenaged juggle of excited and awkward, in spite of this outing taking his character in some boring directions. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "Spider-Man: Far from Home," 1 July 2019 While mental illnesses can mean time away from the office (employees coping with depression miss approximately twice as many work days per year) and job performance issues, many women learn to master the juggle and thrive at work. Caitlin Flynn, Glamour, "How To Talk To Your Boss About Your Mental Health," 27 Mar. 2019 The Marvel Comics movie-rights juggle has lingered for years, thanks to Sony and Fox having a stake in a few major properties. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "Venom film review: Stupid, but still good enough to bite your head off," 5 Oct. 2018 Senator Tammy Duckworth carried her infant daughter onto the Senate floor in April, and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern brought her child to the United Nationsin September—all proving the juggle is real but can be handled with class. Mattie Kahn, Glamour, "9 Times Being a Woman in 2018 Was Genuinely Powerful," 30 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'juggle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of juggle

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1664, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for juggle

Verb

Middle English jogelen, from Anglo-French jugler, from Latin joculari to jest, joke, from joculus, diminutive of jocus joke

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Time Traveler for juggle

Time Traveler

The first known use of juggle was in the 15th century

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Statistics for juggle

Last Updated

8 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Juggle.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/juggles. Accessed 9 December 2019.

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More Definitions for juggle

juggle

verb
How to pronounce juggle (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of juggle

: to keep several objects in motion in the air at the same time by repeatedly throwing and catching them
: to do (several things) at the same time
: to make changes to (something) in order to achieve a desired result

juggle

verb
jug·​gle | \ ˈjə-gəl How to pronounce juggle (audio) \
juggled; juggling

Kids Definition of juggle

1 : to keep several things moving in the air at the same time
2 : to work or do (several things) at the same time She juggles work and school.

Other Words from juggle

juggler \ ˈjəg-​lər \ noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on juggle

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for juggle

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with juggle

Spanish Central: Translation of juggle

Nglish: Translation of juggle for Spanish Speakers

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