jargon

noun
jar·gon | \ˈjär-gən, -ˌgän\

Definition of jargon 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group sports jargon

2 : obscure and often pretentious language marked by circumlocutions and long words an academic essay filled with jargon

3a : confused unintelligible language

b : a strange, outlandish, or barbarous language or dialect

c : a hybrid language or dialect simplified in vocabulary and grammar and used for communication between peoples of different speech

jargon

verb
jargoned; jargoning; jargons

Definition of jargon (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from jargon

Noun

jargony \ˈjär-gə-nē, -ˌgä-nē \ adjective

Examples of jargon in a Sentence

Noun

medical jargon that the layman cannot understand an academic essay filled with jargon

Verb

the birds who began jargoning to greet the dawn
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

When hundreds of millions of dollars are on the line, however, investors should expect transparency — not slippery & confusing language masquerading as industry jargon. Polina Marinova, Fortune, "Term Sheet -- Friday, May 4," 4 May 2018 His speeches, laden with Marxist jargon and revolutionary slogans, rarely break new ground. Mimi Whitefield And Nora Gámez Torres, miamiherald, "Who is Miguel Díaz-Canel, Cuba's handpicked president? | Miami Herald," 19 Apr. 2018 The periodic fights over whether literature professors deploy too much arcane theory or off-putting jargon aren’t really the issue, either. Josh Macht, BostonGlobe.com, "Can tech save the humanities?," 6 Apr. 2018 That’s the message from the Federal Aviation Administration, which said as emphatically as skillfully fashioned legal jargon can describe Tuesday, that squeezing the nation’s expanding bottoms into shrinking airline seats is not its problem. Ashley Halsey Iii, Washington Post, "FAA tells airline passengers ‘We’re a safety agency, not a creature comfort agency’," 3 July 2018 Like any patent application, this one was dense with legal jargon. Timothy B. Lee, Ars Technica, "Inventor says Google is patenting work he put in the public domain," 10 June 2018 This novel is filled with smart insights into aging parents, female friendships, tricky family dynamics and failing marriages, while too easily lapsing into women’s magazine jargon (enough with the Sandwich Generation). Alex Witchel, New York Times, "Allison Pearson ‘Does It’ Again," 1 June 2018 Brown gives Ortiz a talk on race strategy, with detailed jargon that the uninitiated can only loosely translate as: Let another horse challenge Justify at the start to tire him out, then grind it out to the finish. Kalyn Kahler, SI.com, "A Saturday at the Belmont With Gronk," 11 June 2018 In financial jargon, risk premia are being repriced. Richard Barley, WSJ, "Global Markets: A New, More Difficult Stage," 4 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

That’s like the same thing that happened in 2008 when everybody was bedazzled by all these Wall Street jargon terms like collateralized debt obligations. Recode Staff, Recode, "Full transcript: Corey Pein, author of ‘Live Work Work Work Die,’ on Recode Decode," 13 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'jargon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of jargon

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for jargon

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French jargun, gargon

Verb

see jargon entry 1

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Statistics for jargon

Last Updated

18 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for jargon

The first known use of jargon was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for jargon

jargon

noun

English Language Learners Definition of jargon

: the language used for a particular activity or by a particular group of people

jargon

noun
jar·gon | \ˈjär-gən, -ˌgän\

Kids Definition of jargon

1 : the special vocabulary of an activity or group sports jargon

2 : language that is not clear and is full of long words

jargon

noun
jar·gon | \ˈjär-gən, -ˌgän \

Medical Definition of jargon 

1 : the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity, group, profession, or field of study medical jargon

2 : unintelligible, meaningless, or incoherent speech (as that associated with Wernicke's aphasia or some forms of schizophrenia)

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Comments on jargon

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