irrevocable

adjective
ir·​rev·​o·​ca·​ble | \ i-ˈre-və-kə-bəl How to pronounce irrevocable (audio) , ˌi(r)-, sometimes ˌir-(r)ə-ˈvō-kə- How to pronounce irrevocable (audio) \

Definition of irrevocable

: not possible to revoke : unalterable an irrevocable decision

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Other Words from irrevocable

irrevocability \ i-​ˌre-​və-​kə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē How to pronounce irrevocability (audio) , ˌir-​(r)ə-​ˌvō-​kə-​ \ noun
irrevocableness \ i-​ˈre-​və-​kə-​bəl-​nəs How to pronounce irrevocableness (audio) , ˌir-​(r)ə-​ˈvō-​kə-​ \ noun
irrevocably \ i-​ˈre-​və-​kə-​blē How to pronounce irrevocably (audio) , ˌi(r)-​ , sometimes  ˌir-​(r)ə-​ˈvō-​kə-​ \ adverb

Irrevocable and Trusts

Irrevocable has a formal sound to it and is often used in legal contexts. Irrevocable trusts are trust funds that cannot be dissolved by the people who created them (the other kind is a revocable trust). An irrevocable credit is an absolute obligation from a bank to provide credit to a customer. Irrevocable gifts, under U.S. tax law, are gifts that are given by one living person to another and can't be reclaimed by the giver. But the word isn't always legal; we've all had to make irrevocable decisions, decisions that commit us absolutely to something.

Examples of irrevocable in a Sentence

She has made an irrevocable decision.

Recent Examples on the Web

In order to do so, work with an elder law attorney to create an irrevocable trust at least five years in advance of the need for Medicaid services. Mort Mazor, sun-sentinel.com, "Facing life care reality | Opinion," 29 Aug. 2019 The prospect of this irrevocable genetic change is why, since the advent of CRISPR as a genome editor 5 years earlier, the editing of human embryos, eggs, or sperm has been hotly debated. Jon Cohen, Science | AAAS, "The untold story of the ‘circle of trust’ behind the world’s first gene-edited babies," 1 Aug. 2019 Drug companies have yet to report any cases of such actions causing irrevocable damage to a trial, but some researchers worry that information-sharing by participants could sink trials or weaken their findings. Heidi Ledford, Scientific American, "A Question of Control," 16 May 2019 An elongated Brexit will be deemed a price worth paying for an irrevocable Brexit. Craig Berry, Quartz, "Boris Johnson’s hard Brexit cabinet actually makes a soft Brexit more likely," 26 July 2019 In a sign that the Queen’s decision is irrevocable, the palace revealed that her beloved corgis had already been flown to Toronto. Andy Borowitz, The New Yorker, "Queen Elizabeth Moving to Canada," 23 July 2019 Because the trust is irrevocable, the transferor cannot revoke the trust and reacquire the trust assets; therefore, the assets are not available for Medicaid eligibility purposes. Wesley E. Wright, Houston Chronicle, "Elder Law: Navigate Medicaid planning with irrevocable trusts," 19 July 2019 The gift is irrevocable, but the donor can usually decide how the money is invested, which charities get grants and when. Kathleen Pender, SFChronicle.com, "Silicon Valley foundation’s crypto assets plunged, but donations rose in 2018," 22 June 2019 The type of trust that is typically used by those interested in preserving assets and becoming eligible for future Medicaid benefits is an irrevocable trust. Wesley E. Wright, Houston Chronicle, "Elder Law: Navigate Medicaid planning with irrevocable trusts," 19 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'irrevocable.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of irrevocable

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for irrevocable

Middle English, from Latin irrevocabilis, from in- + revocabilis revocable

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Statistics for irrevocable

Last Updated

2 Sep 2019

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Time Traveler for irrevocable

The first known use of irrevocable was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for irrevocable

irrevocable

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of irrevocable

formal : not capable of being changed : impossible to revoke

irrevocable

adjective
ir·​rev·​o·​ca·​ble | \ i-ˈre-və-kə-bəl How to pronounce irrevocable (audio) \

Kids Definition of irrevocable

: impossible to take away or undo an irrevocable decision

Other Words from irrevocable

irrevocably \ -​blē \ adverb

irrevocable

adjective
ir·​rev·​o·​ca·​ble | \ ir-ˈre-və-kə-bəl How to pronounce irrevocable (audio) \

Legal Definition of irrevocable

: not capable of being revoked the offer was irrevocable for ten days

Other Words from irrevocable

irrevocability noun
irrevocably adverb

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