interject

verb
in·​ter·​ject | \ ˌin-tər-ˈjekt How to pronounce interject (audio) \
interjected; interjecting; interjects

Definition of interject

transitive verb

: to throw in between or among other things : interpolate interject a remark

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Other Words from interject

interjector \ ˌin-​tər-​ˈjek-​tər How to pronounce interjector (audio) \ noun
interjectory \ ˌin-​tər-​ˈjek-​t(ə-​)rē How to pronounce interjectory (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for interject

introduce, insert, insinuate, interpolate, intercalate, interpose, interject mean to put between or among others. introduce is a general term for bringing or placing a thing or person into a group or body already in existence. introduced a new topic into the conversation insert implies putting into a fixed or open space between or among. inserted a clause in the contract insinuate implies introducing gradually or by gentle pressure. insinuated himself into the group interpolate applies to the inserting of something extraneous or spurious. interpolated her own comments into the report intercalate suggests an intrusive inserting of something in an existing series or sequence. new chapters intercalated with the old interpose suggests inserting an obstruction or cause of delay. interpose barriers to communication interject implies an abrupt or forced introduction. interjected a question

Did You Know?

According to its Latin roots, interject ought to mean literally "throw between". For most of the word's history, however, the only things that have been interjected have been comments dropped suddenly into a conversation. Interjections are often humorous, and sometimes even insulting, and the best interjections are so quick that the conversation isn't even interrupted.

Examples of interject in a Sentence

“That's an interesting idea,” he interjected, “but I don't think you've considered all of the details.” She listened to us, interjecting remarks every so often. If I may interject, I have things I'd like to add.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Drawing on that filmmaking muscle, Layton interjects interviews with some of the original suspects into the proceedings. Chris Foran, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'Jurassic World' sequel, Mr. Rogers movie battle it out; also, where to watch free movies," 21 June 2018 His defense attorney interjected twice to correct translations. Eva Dou, WSJ, "China to Retry Long-Held Canadian on Drug Charges," 31 Dec. 2018 Smith interjected at one point to show a graph that compared sea levels rising at a sedate pace even as carbon emissions boomed. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Clean air, water on voters’ agenda, but not Congress’," 18 May 2018 And in a meeting with lawmakers Tuesday, Trump very nearly agreed with Democrats on basically everything to do with immigration — until House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) interjected to correct him. Amber Phillips, Washington Post, "President Trump made Congress's life impossible this week (again)," 12 Jan. 2018 The aim was to balance out the overwhelmingly male and white beer world, where, Su said, men often feel entitled to interject their own opinions when women customers asked women bartenders, like her, for recommendations. Rebecca Jennings, Vox, "A men’s rights activist sued a women’s beer event," 24 Oct. 2018 Soon after, Knotz interjected a series of upbeat and raw lyrics, launching a sky-high concert experience that quickly drew its audience into complete silence. Grace Dickinson, Philly.com, "Secret concert series Sofar Sounds is growing too big for the living room," 27 June 2018 Reporters and on-air analysts have interjected the question of race into this story. Fox News, "Brit Hume on fallout from Kavanaugh hearing; Alan Dershowitz on Rachel Mitchell's performance," 28 Sep. 2018 The only dispute was about what jurors should be told about how to interpret questions and comments interjected by the judge during the course of the trial. Chad Day, The Seattle Times, "Closing arguments set in Manafort’s financial fraud trial," 14 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'interject.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of interject

1588, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for interject

Latin interjectus, past participle of intericere, from inter- + jacere to throw — more at jet

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Statistics for interject

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Time Traveler for interject

The first known use of interject was in 1588

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More Definitions for interject

interject

verb

English Language Learners Definition of interject

formal : to interrupt what someone else is saying with (a comment, remark, etc.)

interject

verb
in·​ter·​ject | \ ˌin-tər-ˈjekt How to pronounce interject (audio) \
interjected; interjecting

Kids Definition of interject

: to put between or among other things I interjected a remark.

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More from Merriam-Webster on interject

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with interject

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for interject

Spanish Central: Translation of interject

Nglish: Translation of interject for Spanish Speakers

Comments on interject

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