intensive

adjective
in·​ten·​sive | \ in-ˈten(t)-siv How to pronounce intensive (audio) \

Definition of intensive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: of, relating to, or marked by intensity or intensification: such as
a : highly concentrated intensive study
b : tending to strengthen or increase especially : tending to give force or emphasis intensive adverb
c : constituting or relating to a method designed to increase productivity by the expenditure of more capital and labor rather than by increase in scope intensive farming

intensive

noun

Definition of intensive (Entry 2 of 2)

: an intensive linguistic element

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from intensive

Adjective

intensively adverb
intensiveness noun

intensive purposes or intents and purposes?

If you are casting about for the phrase that is used to say that “one thing has the same effect or result as something else,” you are looking for for all intents and purposes; you are not looking for intensive purposes. Your purposes may indeed be intensive in some way (we don’t want to know the details), but these two words are not commonly found together as an idiom. The pairing of intents and purposes comes from a 1546 Act of Parliament conveying that King Henry VIII had unlimited power to interpret laws; it contained the phrase “to all intents, constructions, and purposes.”

Examples of intensive in a Sentence

Adjective

an intensive course in business writing an intensive effort to prevent an adult bookstore from opening in town

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

There’s an outside chance this beer could emerge because the label approved was for a keg, and filling a handful of kegs for an experiment like this would make much more sense than the labor-intensive step of bottling it. Josh Noel, chicagotribune.com, "Goose Island's 2019 Bourbon County beer lineup emerging — or is it? Some labels are probably fakes.," 11 June 2019 Though the jobs are often labor-intensive, agricultural professions maintain some of the highest median ages in the country, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Andrew Soergel, BostonGlobe.com, "Seniors are more likely to work past 65 in big metro areas like Boston, data show," 10 June 2019 In Virginia, which had more slaves than any other state throughout the antebellum period, soil exhaustion and trade disruption persuaded many white planters to shift from tobacco to less labor-intensive wheat farming. Nicholas Guyatt, The New York Review of Books, "How Proslavery Was the Constitution?," 6 June 2019 But his most recent works bring his labor-intensive processes to the forefront of the viewer’s experience. Catherine Scott, Vogue, "Lehmann Maupin Gallery Celebrates McArthur Binion’s Inaugural Exhibition With a Vibrant Dinner in New York City," 18 Jan. 2019 That's a lot of power for gaming, photo and video editing, and other labor-intensive tasks. Valentina Palladino, Ars Technica, "HP updates Spectre x360 2-in-1s with webcam privacy switch, more battery life," 23 Oct. 2018 As residents sift through the ashes and start the labor-intensive process of rebuilding, some neighbors and family members are hoping to help through fundraising. Lyndsay Winkley, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Community comes together to drum up support for Alpine fire victims left homeless," 9 July 2018 By the end of second grade, I was enrolled in an intensive summer school program for dyslexics. Lisa Wood Shapiro, WIRED, "The End of Dyslexia," 18 June 2018 Child psychiatrist Thomas Tarshis, who directs mental health clinics for Bay Area teens, said his clinicians use a similar type of prompting exercise in intensive outpatient programs. San Francisco Chronicle, "A Retreat’s Risky Lessons," 14 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

So Hong Kong has become a central hub for short-term theological intensives, distance Bible seminaries and networking conventions. Time, "Guerrillas for God: How Hong Kong’s Pastors Are Delivering the Message to China’s Christians," 5 Mar. 2018 Some students compete nearly every weekend during the season, which runs approximately September to July, and train at intensives and classes during the rest of the year. Lizzie Feidelson, New York Times, "Inside the High-Drama World of Youth Competition Dance," 21 Dec. 2017 Edwards is a graduate of the Baltimore School for the Arts and attended various workshops and intensives including Alvin Ailey, Dance Theatre of Harlem, Joffrey, Kirov and the New York City Ballet. Valerie Bonk, baltimoresun.com, "Ballet After Dark uses dance, meditation to heal emotional scars," 23 Aug. 2017 A member of the company for 12 years, she has been accepted into countless dance intensives over the years and this summer will study with the Milwaukee Ballet, the Kansas City Ballet and the Ballet Austin summer programs. David Laurell, Burbank Leader, "On the Town: From Sinatra to Madonna, student dancers channel the icons at Red Chair recital," 20 June 2017 These intensives are modern-day miniatures of the old C.M.S. experience. Giovanni Russonello, New York Times, "Creative Music Studio Changes Hands at a Critical Moment for Jazz," 26 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intensive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of intensive

Adjective

1604, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1813, in the meaning defined above

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about intensive

Statistics for intensive

Last Updated

19 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for intensive

The first known use of intensive was in 1604

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for intensive

intensive

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of intensive

: involving very great effort or work
grammar : giving force or emphasis to a statement
of farming : designed to increase production without using more land

intensive

adjective
in·​ten·​sive | \ in-ˈten-siv How to pronounce intensive (audio) \

Kids Definition of intensive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : involving special effort or concentration intensive study
2 : giving emphasis The pronoun “myself” in “I myself did it” is intensive.

intensive

noun

Kids Definition of intensive (Entry 2 of 2)

: a word that emphasizes or stresses something “Quite” is an intensive in “quite a musician.”

intensive

adjective
in·​ten·​sive | \ in-ˈten(t)-siv How to pronounce intensive (audio) \

Medical Definition of intensive

: of, relating to, or marked by an extreme degree especially of dosage, duration, or frequency high-dose intensive chemotherapy intensive counseling for eating disorders

Other Words from intensive

intensively adverb
treat intensively

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on intensive

What made you want to look up intensive? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

behavior toward others

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Words for Summer: A Quiz

  • a closeup of a sunflower
  • Which of the following words means “of or relating to summer”?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Add Diction

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!