intemperate

adjective
in·​tem·​per·​ate | \ (ˌ)in-ˈtem-p(ə-)rət How to pronounce intemperate (audio) \

Definition of intemperate

: not temperate intemperate criticism especially : given to excessive use of intoxicating liquors

Other Words from intemperate

intemperately adverb
intemperateness noun

Did you know?

Intemperate means "not well tempered"—in other words, not well mixed or balanced. The word comes from Latin intemperatus, a combination of in- and the verb temperare, meaning "to temper" or "to mix."

Examples of intemperate in a Sentence

intemperate anger that is so extreme that the man should be in therapy a serious course in wine appreciation that does not welcome intemperate drinkers and party animals
Recent Examples on the Web But despite the intemperate ramblings of the current occupant of the Oval Office, there is no support whatsoever in the Congress or the country for a war of regime change in Russia. Ben Domenech, National Review, 5 Apr. 2022 Three months, and not one player reaching for his phone in an intemperate moment, publicly second-guessing the negotiating strategy of his union. Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times, 26 Feb. 2022 We are thus left with an object lesson on the perils of intemperate rhetoric and absurd arguments when employed in the service of dubious, unlikely to be met goals. Bradley Gitz, Arkansas Online, 31 Jan. 2022 Something more assertive is required: a crust that can stand up for itself, that holds without crumbling and can survive intemperate handling and a long, brisk walk. Ruby Tandoh, The New Yorker, 19 Nov. 2021 The cutoff was accompanied by some intemperate commentary from the business community. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, 12 Oct. 2021 If not for the permanence of computerized keystrokes, the intemperate remarks of teenagers could be easily ignored or charitably forgotten. Tim Sullivan, The Courier-Journal, 15 Sep. 2021 The president is deeply ambivalent about the rise of the country’s capitalist class, note the public rebuke meted out to Jack Ma late last year for his intemperate outburst on the ills of China’s financial system. Vasuki Shastry, Forbes, 3 Sep. 2021 De Grey vexes many in the life-extension community, and one reason may be his intemperate life style. Margaret Talbot, The New Yorker, 11 Aug. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intemperate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of intemperate

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for intemperate

Middle English intemperat, from Latin intemperatus, from in- + temperatus, past participle of temperare to temper

Learn More About intemperate

Time Traveler for intemperate

Time Traveler

The first known use of intemperate was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Listen to Our Podcast About intemperate

Dictionary Entries Near intemperate

intemperancy

intemperate

intemperature

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for intemperate

Last Updated

19 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Intemperate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/intemperate. Accessed 17 May. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for intemperate

intemperate

adjective
in·​tem·​per·​ate | \ in-ˈtem-pə-rət How to pronounce intemperate (audio) \

Kids Definition of intemperate

1 : not moderate or mild intemperate weather
2 : having or showing a lack of self-control (as in the use of alcoholic beverages)

More from Merriam-Webster on intemperate

Nglish: Translation of intemperate for Spanish Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Eponyms: Words Named After People

Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!