intemperate

adjective
in·​tem·​per·​ate | \(ˌ)in-ˈtem-p(ə-)rət \

Definition of intemperate 

: not temperate intemperate criticism especially : given to excessive use of intoxicating liquors

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from intemperate

intemperately adverb
intemperateness noun

Did You Know?

Intemperate means more or less "not well tempered"-and that definition also provides a clue about its origins. The word derives from Latin intemperatus, formed by combining "in-" with a form of the verb temperare, meaning "to temper" or "to mix." Both "intemperate" and its antonym "temperate" entered the English language in the 14th century. Other "temperare" words include "distemper," "temperament," "temperature," "temperance," and "temper" itself. Synonyms of "intemperate" in the sense of "not controlled" include "unbounded," "unbridled," "unrestrained," and "unchecked."

Examples of intemperate in a Sentence

intemperate anger that is so extreme that the man should be in therapy a serious course in wine appreciation that does not welcome intemperate drinkers and party animals

Recent Examples on the Web

Mr Trump’s confrontational approach has only added to worries that a full falling-out is only an intemperate tweet away. The Economist, "Will Donald Trump be Triumphant, Tetchy or Torpedo?," 5 July 2018 Which is why anything that heightens international antagonism — even an intemperate tweet — sends shivers through the market, while the barest hints of melioration warm portfolios everywhere, if only for a few hours. Evan Horowitz, BostonGlobe.com, "Wall Street hates Trump’s trade threats as much as it loves his tax cut," 27 June 2018 Lawmakers talked over each other and the witness, in sometimes starkly personal and intemperate terms. BostonGlobe.com, "FBI agent Strzok feuds with GOP critics at hearing," 13 July 2018 That a hotheaded, highborn Southerner killed a working man confirmed Northern fears about the intemperate behavior of Southern defenders of slavery, according to Gugliotta. Robert Mitchell, Washington Post, "A hungry congressman didn’t get the breakfast he ordered. So he shot the waiter.," 23 June 2018 Sometimes the reporters are admonished by their editors for being too voicey, too intemperate, too much themselves. Megan Garber, The Atlantic, "The Fourth Estate in the Age of Bad Faith," 15 June 2018 Even many who supported candidate Trump have been revolted by his intemperate, cruel and dangerous rhetoric, and by some of his policies. Michael S. Roth, Washington Post, "Our graduates should answer cynicism and insults with inquiry and reflection," 29 May 2018 Trump’s most intemperate outbursts, his most indecent musings, pale before opinions that were mainstream in living memory. Ezra Klein, Vox, "American democracy has faced worse threats than Donald Trump," 10 May 2018 The book was for the most part well received, but one very mixed review came from George Bird Grinnell, now the editor of Forest and Stream, who had replaced the brilliant but intemperate Charles Hallock. Philip Dray, Time, "How This Photo of Theodore Roosevelt in Hunting Gear Helped Jump-Start the American Conservation Movement," 1 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intemperate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of intemperate

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for intemperate

Middle English intemperat, from Latin intemperatus, from in- + temperatus, past participle of temperare to temper

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about intemperate

Share intemperate

Listen to Our Podcast about intemperate

Statistics for intemperate

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for intemperate

The first known use of intemperate was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for intemperate

intemperate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of intemperate

: having extreme conditions

: having or showing a lack of emotional calmness or control

: often drinking too much alcohol

intemperate

adjective
in·​tem·​per·​ate | \in-ˈtem-pə-rət \

Kids Definition of intemperate

1 : not moderate or mild intemperate weather

2 : having or showing a lack of self-control (as in the use of alcoholic beverages)

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on intemperate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for intemperate

Spanish Central: Translation of intemperate

Nglish: Translation of intemperate for Spanish Speakers

Comments on intemperate

What made you want to look up intemperate? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

something that serves to warn or remind

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Autumn Words of the Day 2018

  • a-top-down-image-of-road-through-an-autumn-forest
  • Which is a synonym of fugacious?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!