insider

noun
in·​sid·​er | \ (ˌ)in-ˈsī-dər How to pronounce insider (audio) , ˈin-ˌsī-\

Definition of insider

: a person recognized or accepted as a member of a group, category, or organization: such as
a : a person who is in a position of power or has access to confidential information
b : a person (such as an officer or director) who is in a position to have special knowledge of the affairs of or to influence the decisions of a company

Examples of insider in a Sentence

Political insiders say that she is planning to run for president. The book gives fans an insider's view of Hollywood.

Recent Examples on the Web

Astros insider: Wade Miley searches for solution Oakland struck six straight one-out singles against Miley in the first. Chandler Rome, Houston Chronicle, "Wade Miley gets torched again as Astros suffer blowout loss to A's," 11 Sep. 2019 Some industry insiders, however, have questioned Apple’s content strategy. Wendy Lee, Los Angeles Times, "Apple ups the stakes in streaming wars with $4.99 a month price for Apple TV+," 10 Sep. 2019 The rankings here are based on polls of New Hampshire voters, interviews with more than a dozen, activists, operatives, and insiders, and an analysis of the on-the-ground infrastructure each campaign has built. James Pindell, BostonGlobe.com, "Who will win? Ranking the Democratic primary candidates in New Hampshire," 6 Sep. 2019 Through it all, Esalen has dealt with media/pop culture portrayals that insiders say paint an incomplete, often stereotypical picture. Wallace Baine, SFChronicle.com, "What’s next for the Esalen Institute?," 5 Sep. 2019 Quorum Report, a newsletter and website for Capitol insiders, first received credentials in 1983. Dallas News, "Michael Quinn Sullivan's secret audio of Texas House speaker blurs line between journalism, activism," 22 Aug. 2019 Like most companies that go public, Lyft included a lock-up period in its IPO terms that barred company insiders—employees, management, and pre-IPO investors—from selling their holdings for 180 days from the day of the offering. Alison Griswold, Quartz, "Lyft’s IPO is outperforming Uber’s in one crucial way," 19 Aug. 2019 The licensing fees are also viewed by industry insiders as an example of the multiple levies that small and medium sized business owners often complain about in Lagos. Yomi Kazeem, Quartz Africa, "Bike-hailing startups in Lagos may soon have to pay thousands of dollars in state fees," 22 July 2019 No one yet knows if the tougher scooters will make scooter-sharing profitable, so Lyft’s and Uber’s offerings are likely to be watched closely by industry insiders. Elizabeth Lopatto, The Verge, "Lyft introduces pink-wheeled scooter that it says is better for scooter sharing," 14 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'insider.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of insider

1848, in the meaning defined above

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Statistics for insider

Last Updated

15 Sep 2019

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Time Traveler for insider

The first known use of insider was in 1848

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More Definitions for insider

insider

noun

Financial Definition of insider

What It Is

An insider is an employee, director or any other person who is privy to confidential, nonpublic information about a company.

How It Works

Given their position, managers and executives within a company are privy to information about a company's operations that is not available to the investing public. The news and details of an upcoming merger or special dividend that have not yet been announced are two examples of insider information. Once information has been made public by the company, it is no longer considered "insider" information.

Why It Matters

Individuals with access to insider information have an unfair advantage in the market. Using this information to base a trade is an illegal practice known as "insider trading."

It is also illegal for a person with insider information to pass it to a third party so that they may use the information to profit.

Source: Investing Answers

insider

noun

English Language Learners Definition of insider

: a person who belongs to a group or organization and has special knowledge about it

insider

noun
in·​sid·​er | \ in-ˈsī-dər How to pronounce insider (audio) \

Kids Definition of insider

: a member of a group or organization who has information about it

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insider

noun
in·​sid·​er

Legal Definition of insider

: a person who is in a position of power or has access to confidential information: as
a : one (as an officer, director, employee, relative, or owner of more than 10% of the corporation's stock) who is in a position to have special knowledge of the affairs of or to influence the decisions of a company
b : an individual (as a relative or an influential party) or entity (as a corporate affiliate) having a close relationship with a debtor such that transactions are not made at arm's length and are subject to closer scrutiny than the transactions of those dealing at arm's length

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More from Merriam-Webster on insider

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with insider

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for insider

Spanish Central: Translation of insider

Nglish: Translation of insider for Spanish Speakers

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