implication

noun

im·​pli·​ca·​tion ˌim-plə-ˈkā-shən How to pronounce implication (audio)
1
: something implied: such as
a
: a possible significance
the book has political implications
2
a
: close connection
especially : an incriminating involvement
b
: the act of implicating : the state of being implicated
3
a
: the act of implying : the state of being implied
b(1)
: a logical relation between two propositions that fails to hold only if the first is true and the second is false see Truth Table
(2)
: a logical relationship between two propositions in which if the first is true the second is true
(3)
: a statement exhibiting a relation of implication
implicative
ˈim-plə-ˌkā-tiv How to pronounce implication (audio)
im-ˈpli-kə-
adjective
implicatively adverb
implicativeness noun

Examples of implication in a Sentence

… but whereas Updike and Roth work to establish connection and coherence in the face of time's chaos, DeLillo is an artist of diffusion and dispersal, of implication and missing information. A. O. Scott, New York Times Book Review, 21 May 2006
… the power of ideas to transform the world is itself accelerating. Although people readily agree with this observation when simply stated, very few people truly appreciate its profound implications. Ray Kurzweil, Curious Minds, (2004) 2005
… the astronomer Edwin Hubble found that the universe is expanding, and by implication must have originated a finite time ago in an explosion popularly called the big bang. Paul Davies, The New Physics, 1989
I'm offended by his implication that women can't be good at mathematics. He condemned the court and, by implication, the entire legal system. He was shocked by the implication of his partner in the theft. See More
Recent Examples on the Web And beyond Mandalika, human rights advocates and experts are increasingly concerned about the project’s implications for ethical standards in global development financing going forward. TIME, 5 Feb. 2024 Elon Musk last week said that his Neuralink company has implanted its first brain chip in a human being, kicking off a lot of debate and hype about the implications of the technology. Diane Brady, Fortune, 5 Feb. 2024 Suddenly, in this Central Brooklyn bubble, New York parents were confronted with the real-world implications of Mayor Eric Adams’s shelter eviction policy, which forces families to reapply for shelter after 60 days. Jay Root Victor J. Blue, New York Times, 4 Feb. 2024 In other games: No. 2 Montgomery 48, No. 4 Torrey Pines 19: In a game with major playoff implications, Montgomery raced to a 25-5 halftime advantage and ran away from the Falcons. John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune, 4 Feb. 2024 Students pressed us on the long-term implications of some historical events (say, the 1939 White Paper, with which the British severely restricted Jewish immigration) that most were encountering for the first time. Bernard Avishai, The New Yorker, 2 Feb. 2024 Rabbitte hopes the lawsuit will force the judge to reckon directly with the property-rights issue and the implications for the way claims are valued. Joel Khalili, WIRED, 2 Feb. 2024 Candidates might face questions on tax planning and compliance and the implications of different tax choices. Bryce Welker, Miami Herald, 2 Feb. 2024 Though much of society seems mostly focused on the aesthetics of being overweight, doctors look past any cosmetic concerns to focus on the health implications of fat byproducts in the body. Eyleen Jorgelina O'Rourke, The Conversation, 22 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'implication.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English implicacioun "complication, complexity," borrowed from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French implicacion "act of implying," borrowed from Medieval Latin implicātiōn-, implicātiō "entanglement, act of implying something, statement with implicit meaning," going back to Latin, "action of weaving in, intricacy," from implicāre "to fold about itself, entwine, involve" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action — more at implicate

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2b

Time Traveler
The first known use of implication was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near implication

Cite this Entry

“Implication.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/implication. Accessed 21 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

implication

noun
im·​pli·​ca·​tion ˌim-plə-ˈkā-shən How to pronounce implication (audio)
1
: the act of implicating : the state of being implicated
2
a
: the act of implying : the state of being implied
b
: something implied

Legal Definition

implication

noun
im·​pli·​ca·​tion ˌim-plə-ˈkā-shən How to pronounce implication (audio)
1
: the act of implicating : the state of being implicated
2
: the act of implying : the state of being implied
3
: something implied
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