impecunious

adjective
im·​pe·​cu·​nious | \ ˌim-pi-ˈkyü-nyəs How to pronounce impecunious (audio) , -nē-əs \

Definition of impecunious

: having very little or no money usually habitually : penniless

Other Words from impecunious

impecuniosity \ ˌim-​pi-​ˌkyü-​nē-​ˈä-​sə-​tē How to pronounce impecunious (audio) \ noun
impecuniously adverb
impecuniousness noun

Did you know?

If impecunious means "penniless," then it stands to reason that "pecunious" can describe someone who has a lot of money. That is true, but "pecunious" is used with far less frequency in English than its opposite and is not found in many dictionaries. What's more, on the rare occasion when "pecunious" is put to use in English, it often means not "wealthy" but "miserly or ungenerous," as in "a pecunious attitude toward the less fortunate." "Impecunious" describes somebody who lacks the money to buy necessities, but it does not carry the connotation of desperation found in such words as "indigent" or "destitute." Both "pecunious" and "impecunious" derive via Middle English from the Latin pecunia, meaning "money."

Examples of impecunious in a Sentence

they were so impecunious that they couldn't afford to give one another even token Christmas gifts
Recent Examples on the Web However, the amateurs Tracksmith has in mind are not so much the impecunious would-be professionals of the past but today’s hardcore hobbyists—the bane of every relaxed camping trip. Martin Fritz Huber, Outside Online, 11 Jan. 2021 Among them is the sardonic confidant, St. Quentin; the down-at-the-heels military man, Major Brutt; and the impecunious, high-living chancer, Eddie. Washington Post, 18 Nov. 2021 Among them is the sardonic confidant, St. Quentin; the down-at-the-heels military man, Major Brutt; and the impecunious, high-living chancer, Eddie. Washington Post, 18 Nov. 2021 Among them is the sardonic confidant, St. Quentin; the down-at-the-heels military man, Major Brutt; and the impecunious, high-living chancer, Eddie. Washington Post, 18 Nov. 2021 Among them is the sardonic confidant, St. Quentin; the down-at-the-heels military man, Major Brutt; and the impecunious, high-living chancer, Eddie. Washington Post, 18 Nov. 2021 Among them is the sardonic confidant, St. Quentin; the down-at-the-heels military man, Major Brutt; and the impecunious, high-living chancer, Eddie. Washington Post, 18 Nov. 2021 Among them is the sardonic confidant, St. Quentin; the down-at-the-heels military man, Major Brutt; and the impecunious, high-living chancer, Eddie. Washington Post, 18 Nov. 2021 Dalton’s impassioned singing style — as if Billie Holiday took up residence in an impecunious Southern misfit — has made fans out a range of contemporaries, from the art-rock auteur Nick Cave to the harpist Joanna Newsom. Washington Post, 1 Oct. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'impecunious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of impecunious

1596, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for impecunious

in- entry 1 + obsolete English pecunious rich, from Middle English, from Latin pecuniosus, from pecunia money — more at fee

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The first known use of impecunious was in 1596

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Dictionary Entries Near impecunious

impecuniary

impecunious

impecunity

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Cite this Entry

“Impecunious.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/impecunious. Accessed 17 Aug. 2022.

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Nglish: Translation of impecunious for Spanish Speakers

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