impartial

adjective
im·​par·​tial | \ (ˌ)im-ˈpär-shəl How to pronounce impartial (audio) \

Definition of impartial

: not partial or biased : treating or affecting all equally

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Other Words from impartial

impartiality \ (ˌ)im-​ˌpär-​shē-​ˈa-​lə-​tē How to pronounce impartial (audio) , -​ˌpär-​ˈsha-​ \ noun
impartially \ (ˌ)im-​ˈpär-​sh(ə-​)lē How to pronounce impartial (audio) \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for impartial

fair, just, equitable, impartial, unbiased, dispassionate, objective mean free from favor toward either or any side. fair implies a proper balance of conflicting interests. a fair decision just implies an exact following of a standard of what is right and proper. a just settlement of territorial claims equitable implies a less rigorous standard than just and usually suggests equal treatment of all concerned. the equitable distribution of the property impartial stresses an absence of favor or prejudice. an impartial third party unbiased implies even more strongly an absence of all prejudice. your unbiased opinion dispassionate suggests freedom from the influence of strong feeling and often implies cool or even cold judgment. a dispassionate summation of the facts objective stresses a tendency to view events or persons as apart from oneself and one's own interest or feelings. I can't be objective about my own child

Impartial vs Partial

To be "partial to" or "partial toward" someone or something is to be somewhat biased or prejudiced, which means that a person who is partial really only sees part of the whole picture. To be impartial is the opposite. The United Nations sends impartial observers to monitor elections in troubled countries. We hope judges and juries will be impartial when they hand down verdicts. But grandparents aren't expected to be impartial when describing their new grandchild.

Examples of impartial in a Sentence

an impartial analysis of the case an impartial evaluation of the job applicant's qualifications that does not consider age, gender, or race
Recent Examples on the Web Everybody should be able to have a fair and impartial trial on their set of facts. Washington Post, "With a verdict, troubled reflections," 21 Apr. 2021 The Providence police were always prepared to take the appropriate steps to keep people safe, keep property safe, and to take fair and impartial measures. BostonGlobe.com, "Providence police preparing for outcome in Chauvin trial," 20 Apr. 2021 Cahill re-questioned them to see if the massive settlement affected their ability to be fair and impartial. Steve Karnowski And Amy Forliti, Chron, "10th juror picked, lawyers clash over expert in Floyd trial," 18 Mar. 2021 Fair and impartial policing are extremely important in our society. NBC News, "Fresno Police Department looking into possible Proud Boys connection to city officer," 15 Mar. 2021 However, based on the analysis by impartial CBO, there WILL be fewer drugs discovered – not one or two, but dozens. John Lamattina, Forbes, "CBO Report Shows Enacting Drug Pricing Legislation Will Result In Fewer New Drugs," 12 Apr. 2021 But more than a year later, no one has been charged in Faizan’s death, raising questions about the police department’s ability to act as an impartial investigator in instances of police brutality. Washington Post, "An Indian man died after being beaten by police on video. One year later, no one has been held accountable.," 8 Apr. 2021 Competitions are more impartial, but to date, no competition has evaluated AI systems in situations so unexpected that not even the system designers could have foreseen them. Mayank Kejriwal, The Conversation, "Embrace the unexpected: To teach AI how to handle new situations, change the rules of the game," 7 Apr. 2021 Under Trump, the EPA had argued scientists who received research funding from the agency would not be able to offer impartial advice. Author: Dino Grandoni, Anchorage Daily News, "EPA chief dismisses dozens of key science advisers picked under Trump," 31 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'impartial.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of impartial

1587, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for impartial

Time Traveler

The first known use of impartial was in 1587

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Statistics for impartial

Last Updated

6 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Impartial.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/impartial. Accessed 16 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for impartial

impartial

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of impartial

: treating all people and groups equally : not partial or biased

impartial

adjective
im·​par·​tial | \ im-ˈpär-shəl How to pronounce impartial (audio) \

Kids Definition of impartial

: not favoring one side over another : fair an impartial referee

Other Words from impartial

impartially adverb

impartial

adjective
im·​par·​tial | \ im-ˈpär-shəl How to pronounce impartial (audio) \

Legal Definition of impartial

: not partial or biased : treating or affecting all equally

Other Words from impartial

impartiality \ im-​ˌpär-​shē-​ˈa-​lə-​tē How to pronounce impartial (audio) \ noun
impartially adverb

Comments on impartial

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