immaculate

adjective
im·​mac·​u·​late | \ i-ˈma-kyə-lət How to pronounce immaculate (audio) \

Definition of immaculate

1 : spotlessly clean an immaculate kitchen immaculate uniforms
2 : having or containing no flaw or error an immaculate record of service in immaculate detail
3 : having no stain or blemish : pure an immaculate heart
4 : having no colored spots or marks used especially in botany and zoologypetals immaculate

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Other Words from immaculate

immaculately adverb
immaculateness noun
… the immaculateness of scrubbed decks … — William Sansom

Did You Know?

The opposite of immaculate is maculate, which means "marked with spots" or "impure." The Latin word maculatus, the past participle of a verb meaning "to stain," is the source of both words and can be traced back to macula, a word that scientists still use for spots on the skin, on the wings of insects, and on the surface of celestial objects. Maculate has not marked as many pages as immaculate, but it has appeared occasionally (one might say "spottily"), especially as an antithesis to immaculate. We find the pair, for example, in an article by Peter Schjeldahl in an April 2004 issue of The New Yorker: "Rob's apartment, with its immaculate ranks of album spines and its all too maculate strewing of everything else…."

Examples of immaculate in a Sentence

… they seemed as remote from metaphysics as their lunch bags and knapsacks. Yet weren't they all heading for those immaculate country snowfields to talk of God? — Cynthia Ozick, Atlantic, May 1997 … and added to this was the fact that this Soviet Army Colonel had a service record that was as immaculate as a field of freshly fallen snow … — Tom Clancy, The Cardinal of the Kremlin, (1988) 1989 I was expecting some giant to emerge, but in came a tiny, immaculate, white-haired man. — Anna Russell, I'm Not Making This Up, You Know, 1985 She had an immaculate record of service. somehow managed to keep the white carpet immaculate
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Recent Examples on the Web This mid-century modern renovated house with a private pool is an immaculate, calm 2-bedroom oasis in the heart of Palm Springs. Luann Gibbs, The Enquirer, "Everything But The House to auction off unique arts experiences," 9 July 2020 The intricate detailing on this style is immaculate. Shalwah Evans, Essence, "5 Ways To Make Your Fourth Of July A Celebration Of Black Beauty," 1 July 2020 Those who score high on this dimension perceive themselves as having an immaculate morality and view everyone else as being immoral. Scott Barry Kaufman, Scientific American, "Unraveling the Mindset of Victimhood," 29 June 2020 No one reads them, something that is attested by the hundreds of thousands of immaculate copies gathering dust in Goodwills and the outdoor free piles of bookstores around the country. Matthew Walther, TheWeek, "The ugly truth of Trump's position on Chinese concentration camps," 20 June 2020 Beauty is also a feature of Fort Worth, which is full of characters in immaculate outfits and men riding horses in elaborate hats. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "In Miss Juneteenth, a Mother’s Dream Deferred," 19 June 2020 The weekend shot shows Grande lounging around her house with her hair half-up, half-down, accessorized with an immaculate cat eye. Shannon Carlin, refinery29.com, "Ariana Grande’s Self-Quarantine Hair Is Brown Honey Dreams," 4 May 2020 Darren has an immaculate dad-bod that rivals Hershel Walker's. Brandon Folsom, Detroit Free Press, "New Detroit Lions RB D'Andre Swift's father is ripped, has the opposite of a dad bod," 25 Apr. 2020 White recalls when, after the crisis of 1929, this immaculate colour was adopted for clothes as an expression of purity in the present, and of hope in the future. Hanna Flanagan, PEOPLE.com, "Vogue Italia Prints All-White Cover for Its April Issue to Signify 'Rebirth' amid Coronavirus Crisis," 8 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'immaculate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of immaculate

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

History and Etymology for immaculate

Middle English immaculat, from Latin immaculatus, from in- + maculatus stained — more at maculate

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Time Traveler for immaculate

Time Traveler

The first known use of immaculate was in the 15th century

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Last Updated

22 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Immaculate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/immaculate. Accessed 6 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for immaculate

immaculate

adjective
How to pronounce immaculate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of immaculate

: perfectly clean
: having no flaw or error

immaculate

adjective
im·​mac·​u·​late | \ i-ˈma-kyə-lət How to pronounce immaculate (audio) \

Kids Definition of immaculate

1 : perfectly clean
2 : having no flaw or error He has an immaculate record.

Other Words from immaculate

immaculately adverb

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Comments on immaculate

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