hurt

verb
\ ˈhərt How to pronounce hurt (audio) \
hurt; hurting

Definition of hurt

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to inflict with physical pain : wound He hurt his back while moving some boxes. was seriously hurt in a car accident You're hurting my arm!
b : to do substantial or material harm to : damage the dry summer has hurt the land
2a : to cause emotional pain or anguish to : offend never meant to hurt you got her feelings hurt
b : to be detrimental to : hamper charges of graft hurt his chances of being elected

intransitive verb

1a : to suffer pain or grief He says his tooth hurts. has been hurting ever since learning of her friend's betrayal
b : to be in need usually used with for hurting for money
2 : to cause damage or distress hit where it hurts

hurt

noun

Definition of hurt (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a cause of injury or damage : blow this tower of granite, weathering the hurts of so many ages— R. W. Emerson
2a : a bodily injury or wound
b : mental or emotional distress or anguish : suffering getting past the hurt of a bitter divorce
3 : wrong, harm subordinating cosmic to moral considerations, to the hurt of both— M. R. Cohen

Other Words from hurt

Verb

hurt adjective
hurter noun

Choose the Right Synonym for hurt

Verb

injure, harm, hurt, damage, impair, mar mean to affect injuriously. injure implies the inflicting of anything detrimental to one's looks, comfort, health, or success. badly injured in an accident harm often stresses the inflicting of pain, suffering, or loss. careful not to harm the animals hurt implies inflicting a wound to the body or to the feelings. hurt by their callous remarks damage suggests injury that lowers value or impairs usefulness. a table damaged in shipping impair suggests a making less complete or efficient by deterioration or diminution. years of smoking had impaired his health mar applies to injury that spoils perfection (as of a surface) or causes disfigurement. the text is marred by many typos

Examples of hurt in a Sentence

Verb Be careful with that knife or you could hurt yourself. Ouch! You're hurting my arm! She was badly hurt in a car accident. My tooth still hurts me. When I woke up this morning I hurt all over. Their lack of interest in her work hurt her deeply. You're only hurting yourself by holding a grudge against them. It hurt me to see her go. The lack of rain has hurt the corn crop. If we lose this game it will seriously hurt our chances of making the play-offs. Noun Her sympathy eased the hurt he felt after his dog's death. They felt a great hurt after their bitter divorce. She tried to put past hurts behind her. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The war has hurt gas supplies but done even more damage to the export of millions of tons of grain, fertilizer and cooking oil, exacerbating famine and food shortages in many parts of the world, but particularly in Africa. Tracy Wilkinsonstaff Writer, Los Angeles Times, 20 Sep. 2022 Penalties hurt the Boilermakers, particularly late, piling up 13 for 138 yards. Scott Horner, The Indianapolis Star, 20 Sep. 2022 The slowdown in business activity could hurt the UK economy at a difficult time. Anna Cooban, CNN, 18 Sep. 2022 Mike Preston, columnist: The same problems that plagued the Ravens last year hurt them again Sunday. Baltimore Sun Staff, Baltimore Sun, 18 Sep. 2022 South Carolina hurt the Razorbacks with a screen pass to running back MarShawn Lloyd to the tune of 43 yards to the Arkansas 15. Arkansas Online, 17 Sep. 2022 Maybe that’s why the movie feels slightly bloated; a little careful trimming wouldn’t have hurt. Stephanie Zacharek, Time, 16 Sep. 2022 That could hurt Democrats, who are trying to protect razor-thin control of the Senate and House. David Koenig, Chron, 15 Sep. 2022 That could hurt Democrats, who are trying to protect razor-thin control of the Senate and House. David Koenig, Anchorage Daily News, 14 Sep. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun During the Thursday public meeting, Vincent residents expressed their hurt and outrage over the texts and demanded further investigation into the incident and accountability for the officers involved. Christine Fernando, USA TODAY, 20 Aug. 2022 Freeman maintains that an inability to commit can stem from a person’s own unique experiences of hurt, resulting in an avoidance of attachments as a means of self-preservation. Jessica Rogers, Rolling Stone, 17 Aug. 2022 Whether talking about xenophobia in Idaho or the loss of jobs in West Virginia, the conversations sometimes only scratch the surface of the hurt, fear, pain, and resistance to change that so many of us contend with. Carolyn Finney, Outside Online, 5 July 2022 Brown, now 71, fueled the what-if-Colt-didn’t-get-hurt talk as recently as a 2019 interview with Stadium after being hired as the coach at North Carolina. Michael Casagrande | Mcasagrande@al.com, al, 8 Sep. 2022 This is fitting: the stories specialize in intimate hurt, the kind that passes between those who might have a reason for solidarity. Katy Waldman, The New Yorker, 29 Aug. 2022 People who tend toward anxious attachment, however, have a harder time trusting that those risks won’t end in hurt. Marisa G. Franco, The Atlantic, 25 Aug. 2022 Marie [Betsy Brandt] makes an appearance, putting a face on the hurt that Saul caused in the Breaking Bad era. Dan Snierson, EW.com, 16 Aug. 2022 Moving on from a past hurt might be this day's main challenge. Chicago Tribune, 30 July 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hurt.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of hurt

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for hurt

Verb and Noun

Middle English, probably from Anglo-French hurter to strike, prick, collide with, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old Norse hrūtr male sheep

Learn More About hurt

Time Traveler for hurt

Time Traveler

The first known use of hurt was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near hurt

Hurston

hurt

hurtable

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Statistics for hurt

Last Updated

23 Sep 2022

Cite this Entry

“Hurt.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hurt. Accessed 2 Oct. 2022.

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More Definitions for hurt

hurt

verb
\ ˈhərt How to pronounce hurt (audio) \
hurt; hurting

Kids Definition of hurt

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : to feel or cause pain My feet hurt. These shoes hurt.
2 : to do harm to : damage The drought has hurt crops.
3 : to cause to be sad "I am sure none of my boys and girls in Room 13 would purposely … hurt anyone's feelings …"— Eleanor Estes, The Hundred Dresses
4 : to make poorer or more difficult The fumble hurt our team's chance of winning.

hurt

noun

Kids Definition of hurt (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : an injury or wound to the body
2 : mental or emotional pain

hurt

adjective

Kids Definition of hurt (Entry 3 of 3)

: physically or emotionally injured a hurt toe hurt feelings

More from Merriam-Webster on hurt

Nglish: Translation of hurt for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hurt for Arabic Speakers

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