homogeneous

adjective
ho·​mo·​ge·​neous | \ ˌhō-mə-ˈjē-nē-əs How to pronounce homogeneous (audio) , -ˈjēn-yəs \

Definition of homogeneous

1 : of the same or a similar kind or nature
2 : of uniform structure or composition throughout a culturally homogeneous neighborhood
3 : having the property that if each variable is replaced by a constant times that variable the constant can be factored out : having each term of the same degree if all variables are considered a homogeneous equation

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Other Words from homogeneous

homogeneously adverb
homogeneousness noun

Did You Know?

The scientific theories of Jules Verne's bold French adventurer, Michel Ardan, might have been a bit flawed (it's more accurate to classify the solar system as "heterogenous" - that is, consisting of dissimilar ingredients or constituents), but his use of the English word homogeneous was perfectly correct. Homogeneous, which derives from the Greek roots homos, meaning "same," and genos, meaning "kind," has been used in English since the mid-1600s. The similar word homogenous (originally created for the science of genetics and used with the meaning "of, relating to, or derived from another individual of the same species") can also be a synonym of homogeneous. The words need not be used exclusively in scientific contexts - one can speak of, for example, "a homogenous/homogeneous community."

Examples of homogeneous in a Sentence

In their natural state, mountains of this type are almost entirely covered by dense forest. The wooded landscape is very uniform, lacking in contrast, and any disturbance of the homogeneous green blanket is very obvious … — John Crowley, Focus on Geography, Winter 2007 One odd side effect is that, during the last 20 years, the formerly homogeneous, rather stodgy world of academic criticism has diversified into an incoherent mob of competing factions. — Walter Kendrick, New York Times Book Review, 24 Dec. 1995 The Benedictine convents for women, which had begun to be founded soon after Benedict's day, became particularly homogeneous in their social composition. The nuns of the ninth and tenth centuries were all high-born ladies, and it was almost impossible to be admitted to these convents without being a widowed or maiden relative of an important lord. — Norman F. Cantor, The Civilization of the Middle Ages, 1993 a fairly homogeneous collection of examples
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Recent Examples on the Web The onus of finding a mentor is on the student, which has generally led the industry to become intergenerational and homogeneous, causing a bottleneck preventing diverse talent from breaking in, White said. Safia Samee Ali, NBC News, 8 June 2021 The key finding was that the force of the explosion in such cases is not greatest at the center, dissipating outward, but generally homogeneous within the cloud, especially if it is contained by outer barriers, as is typically the case. Washington Post, 3 June 2021 Indeed, Denmark is struggling to smooth out conflicts that have arisen from integrating new groups into what was a largely homogeneous population 30 years ago. Lenora Chu, The Christian Science Monitor, 2 June 2021 That now can work for these racially homogeneous communities. Claire Thornton, USA TODAY, 30 May 2021 Computational biases can creep into medical technology when it is tested primarily on a homogeneous group of subjects—typically white males. Claudia Wallis, Scientific American, 27 May 2021 But hours earlier, the Hong Kong government had ordered virtually all of the city’s 370,000 migrant domestic workers — mostly Southeast Asian women in an otherwise largely racially homogeneous city — to take coronavirus tests and vaccines. New York Times, 18 May 2021 As Nella is slowly shut out of a homogeneous industry, Harris presents, in terms both humorous and horrific, the high price of gatekeeping. Annabel Gutterman, Time, 12 May 2021 Princeton and other highly selective universities have long faced criticism for their relatively homogeneous populations, made up largely of white, wealthy students. Melissa Korn, WSJ, 19 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'homogeneous.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of homogeneous

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for homogeneous

Medieval Latin homogeneus, homogenus, from Greek homogenēs, from hom- + genos kind — more at kin

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Time Traveler for homogeneous

Time Traveler

The first known use of homogeneous was in 1641

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Last Updated

11 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Homogeneous.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/homogeneous. Accessed 14 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for homogeneous

homogeneous

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of homogeneous

somewhat formal : made up of the same kind of people or things

homogeneous

adjective
ho·​mo·​ge·​neous | \ -ˈjē-nē-əs, -nyəs How to pronounce homogeneous (audio) \

Medical Definition of homogeneous

: of uniform structure or composition throughout

Other Words from homogeneous

homogeneously adverb
homogeneousness noun

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