hemophilia

noun
he·​mo·​phil·​ia | \ ˌhē-mə-ˈfi-lē-ə How to pronounce hemophilia (audio) \

Definition of hemophilia

: a hereditary, sex-linked blood defect occurring almost exclusively in males that is marked by delayed clotting of the blood with prolonged or excessive internal or external bleeding after injury or surgery and in severe cases spontaneous bleeding into joints and muscles and that is caused by a deficiency of clotting factors

Note: Hemophilia is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait in which the mother must pass on a copy of the defective gene to a male child, and more rarely, both parents must pass on copies of the defective gene to a female child.

— see hemophilia a, hemophilia b

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Did You Know?

The dreaded disease known as hemophilia is the result of an inherited gene, and almost always strikes boys rather than girls (though mothers may pass the gene to their sons). Since the blood lacks an ingredient that causes it to clot or coagulate when a blood vessel breaks, even a minor wound can cause a hemophiliac to bleed to death if not treated. Bleeding can be particularly dangerous when it's entirely internal, with no visible wound, since the person may not be aware it's happening. Queen Victoria transmitted the hemophilia gene to royal families all across Europe; the hemophilia of a young Russian prince played a part in the downfall of the Russian czars. Today, hemophiliacs take drugs that stop the bleeding by speeding coagulation, and hemophiliac life expectancies in developed countries are almost as long as the average.

Examples of hemophilia in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

According to STAT News, fetal tissue was involved in the discovery of treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, cystic fibrosis, and hemophilia. Amanda Macmillan, Health.com, "Fetal Tissue Research Facts and Why It's so Controversial," 6 June 2019 For example, what if one of the gene therapies being developed could cure the hemophilia of that young Iowan? Kate Bachelder Odell, WSJ, "When Medical Innovation Meets Politics," 24 Aug. 2018 Sales of new multiple sclerosis, hemophilia and cancer drugs have been propelling Roche’s pharmaceuticals business in recent quarters. Joseph Walker, WSJ, "Roche Executive Daniel O’Day Is Named Gilead CEO," 10 Dec. 2018 Leopold passed away young as the result of hemophilia, but not before having two children with his wife, Princess Helena—a daughter, Princess Anne, and a son, Charles Edward. Lauren Hubbard, Town & Country, "Queen Victoria's Descendants Still Reign Over Europe," 17 Feb. 2019 Medications to treat hemophilia cost an average of more than $270,000 annually per patient, according to a 2015 Express Scripts report. Jenny Gold, Washington Post, "Of ‘Miracles’ And Money: Why Hemophilia Drugs Are So Expensive," 8 Mar. 2018 With the support of drug manufacturers and hemophilia advocacy groups, patients and their families have significant political clout. Barbara Feder Ostrov, latimes.com, "Case of the $21-million Medicaid patient shows how drug prices soar for rare diseases," 5 Mar. 2018 Treatments for other diseases, including other vision disorders and hemophilia, are now in development. Sumathi Reddy, WSJ, "High Hopes for a Gene Therapy Come With Fears Over Cost," 24 Sep. 2018 Biogen’s decision to spin out its hemophilia division in 2016 paid off in a big way for its shareholders earlier this year, when a French pharma giant bought Bioverativ at a 63% premium. Charley Grant, WSJ, "How Big Biotech Can Win Back Investors," 12 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hemophilia.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hemophilia

1872, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for hemophilia

New Latin

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Statistics for hemophilia

Last Updated

23 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for hemophilia

The first known use of hemophilia was in 1872

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More Definitions for hemophilia

hemophilia

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hemophilia

medical : a serious disease that causes a person who has been cut or injured to keep bleeding for a very long time

hemophilia

noun
he·​mo·​phil·​ia
variants: or chiefly British haemophilia \ ˌhē-​mə-​ˈfil-​ē-​ə How to pronounce haemophilia (audio) \

Medical Definition of hemophilia

: a tendency to uncontrollable bleeding especially : a hereditary, sex-linked blood disorder occurring almost exclusively in males that is marked by delayed clotting of the blood with prolonged or excessive internal or external bleeding after injury or surgery and in severe cases spontaneous bleeding into joints and muscles and that is caused by a deficiency of clotting factors

Note: Hemophilia is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait in which the mother must pass on a copy of the defective gene to a male child, and more rarely, both parents must pass on copies of the defective gene to a female child.

— see hemophilia a, hemophilia b — compare von willebrand disease

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More from Merriam-Webster on hemophilia

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with hemophilia

Spanish Central: Translation of hemophilia

Nglish: Translation of hemophilia for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about hemophilia

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