hearsay

noun

hear·​say ˈhir-ˌsā How to pronounce hearsay (audio)
1
: rumor
like the hearsays bandied about by the medievalists S. N. Behrman
2

Example Sentences

You can't judge them solely on the basis of hearsay. They're supposedly getting married soon, but that's just hearsay.
Recent Examples on the Web Yeah, but now they’re actually filled with facts rather than [hearsay]. Brian Davids, The Hollywood Reporter, 18 Oct. 2022 After an exhaustive, six-month investigation by the Inter-American Development Bank’s outside law firm, the report was unable to corroborate rumors and anonymous hearsay. WSJ, 29 Sep. 2022 Worry Darling; her lack of social media posts about the film and her absence from the cast's press conference at the Venice Film Festival only seemed to confirm the hearsay. Chelsey Sanchez, Harper's BAZAAR, 8 Sep. 2022 Heard’s emotional testimony frequently halted as Depp’s attorneys persistently and successfully objected to various questions, usually citing hearsay or lack of foundation. Washington Post, 5 May 2022 Tidal estimates, mere guesses made on the basis of fallible memory and hearsay, proved ruinously inaccurate and left landing boats stuck on the island’s reef. Catherine Musemeche, Smithsonian Magazine, 7 July 2022 During the trial, the jury got to see some texts sent from the FBI agent to Big Dan — but Big Dan's responding texts were regarded as inadmissible hearsay. Tresa Baldas, Detroit Free Press, 13 July 2022 Michael, a twenty-four-year-old Amazon driver from Massachusetts and a former U.S. Army infantryman, related the same hearsay. Seth Harp, Harper’s Magazine , 22 June 2022 As to the question of whether Walsh was gay, Doran collected a great deal of hearsay but no proof. James Kirchick, Washington Post, 15 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hearsay.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

First Known Use

circa 1532, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of hearsay was circa 1532

Dictionary Entries Near hearsay

Cite this Entry

“Hearsay.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hearsay. Accessed 8 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

hearsay

noun
hear·​say ˈhi(ə)r-ˌsā How to pronounce hearsay (audio)
1
: something heard from another : rumor
2

Legal Definition

hearsay

noun
hear·​say ˈhir-ˌsā How to pronounce hearsay (audio)
: a statement made out of court and not under oath which is offered as proof that what is stated is true

called also hearsay evidence

More from Merriam-Webster on hearsay

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