halo

1 of 3

noun

ha·​lo ˈhā-(ˌ)lō How to pronounce halo (audio)
plural halos or haloes
1
: a circle of light appearing to surround the sun or moon and resulting from refraction or reflection of light by ice particles in the atmosphere
2
: something resembling a halo: such as
a
: nimbus
b
: a region of space surrounding a galaxy that is sparsely populated with luminous objects (such as globular clusters) but is believed to contain a great deal of dark matter
c
: a differentiated zone surrounding a central zone or object
d
or halo brace : an orthopedic device used to immobilize the head and neck (as to treat fracture of neck vertebrae) that consists of a metal band placed around the head and fastened to the skull usually with metal pins and that is attached by extensions to an inflexible vest
3
: the aura of glory, veneration, or sentiment surrounding an idealized person or thing

halo

2 of 3

verb

haloed; haloing; haloes

transitive verb

: to form into or surround with a halo
rainbows haloed the waterfalls Michael Crawford

halo-

3 of 3

combining form

see hal-

Example Sentences

Noun the halo of unimpeachable honesty in which the politician had long basked a naturalistic depiction of Saint Peter that shows him as a humble fisherman and without the traditional halo
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The four-headed creator god Brahma sits on a giant lotus, the sun itself acting as his halo. Lee Lawrence, WSJ, 13 Aug. 2022 That’s to say nothing of Giuliani’s willingness to cozy up to strongmen and dictators in return for big paydays, a mercenary brand of globe-trotting that enabled the mayor to cash in on his 9/11 halo. Brent Lang, Variety, 9 June 2022 The chunky Andalusian groove of the first movement gave way to a meditative central sequence, and Dueñas’s violin soared through the stratosphere as chimes and tuned crystal glasses added an eerie halo of sound. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 24 Oct. 2022 The ring appeared to be white gold and featured a halo of diamonds. Emma Kershaw, Peoplemag, 13 Oct. 2022 First proposed by Dutch astronomer Jan Oort in 1950, the Oort Cloud is a spherical halo of comets that stretches out halfway to Proxima Centauri, the Sun’s nearest neighbor, well beyond the view of even the largest telescopes. Byeric Hand, science.org, 5 Oct. 2022 The concept previews a production model that will serve as the brand's halo model in its EV era. Drew Dorian, Car and Driver, 22 July 2022 The CubeSats's goal is to enter an elongated orbit, which is a near rectilinear halo orbit, around the moon for at least six months for research purposes. Megan Marples, CNN, 6 July 2022 Once at the moon, CAPSTONE will enter an orbit called a near rectilinear halo orbit, or NRHO. Julia Musto, Fox News, 28 June 2022
Verb
The larger ones are steeply mountainous, volcanic, rising to almost 6,000 feet, their summits haloed in clouds. Stanley Stewart, Condé Nast Traveler, 22 May 2020 There is a none-too-subtle mystical vibe, from the ring lights that halo the massive trees on Amaya’s Bay Area campus to Forest’s cult-leader magnetism and the cold-burn fervor of his head acolyte, Katie (a quietly terrifying Alison Pill). James Poniewozik, New York Times, 4 Mar. 2020 Nine, the new album from Blink-182, a band forever associated with adolescence even though the members’ mean age is now 44, arrives haloed in that great teenage emotion: embarrassment. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, 20 Sep. 2019 The landlady remains a cipher, and yet a faint aspect of loss haloes her. Katy Waldman, The New Yorker, 21 Aug. 2019 Turner’s head is haloed by the sun, much like the moon during a solar eclipse. Marissa Fessenden, Smithsonian, 4 May 2018 At the time, Mikey was recovering from being neutered and was haloed by a large plastic dog cone around his neck. Marc Lester, adn.com, 16 May 2015 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'halo.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Latin halos, from Greek halōs threshing floor, disk, halo

First Known Use

Noun

1603, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1801, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of halo was in 1603

Dictionary Entries Near halo

Cite this Entry

“Halo.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/halo. Accessed 28 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

halo

noun

ha·​lo
ˈhā-lō
plural halos or haloes
1
: a circle of light around the sun or moon caused by the presence of tiny ice crystals in the air
2
3
: the atmosphere of glory or sentiment surrounding a person or thing considered perfect

Medical Definition

halo

noun

ha·​lo ˈhā-(ˌ)lō How to pronounce halo (audio)
plural halos or haloes
1
: a circle of light appearing to surround a luminous body
especially : one seen as the result of the presence of glaucoma
2
: a differentiated zone surrounding a central object
the halo around a boil
3
: the aura of glory, veneration, or sentiment surrounding an idealized person or thing
4
: an orthopedic device used to immobilize the head and neck (as to treat fracture of neck vertebrae) that consists of a metal band placed around the head and fastened to the skull usually with metal pins and that is attached by extensions to an inflexible vest

called also halo brace

More from Merriam-Webster on halo

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